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In the darkness of death, it is hard to line up thoughts, to arrange memories, to process feelings and ideas. Instead, we can, in this instance, let the dea...

For grassroots economic and social justice activists, there was never any doubt about the identity of their representative in Washington.

The Democrats and Republicans will convene after the election to choose
their leaders for the next Congress.

The party of tired blood badly needs a "regime change" of its own. For
the greater good of the Democrats, Gephardt and Daschle should go.

One of the great disappointments of recent decades is that Democrats
have more or less swallowed whole the underlying economic theories of
their Republican rivals.

Unanimous is what the vote count was.
He didn't miss a voter, to our knowledge.
The triumph his, he now remains in charge,
Unless he lost in the Electoral College.

Cartoonist Jules Feiffer dropped a pinpoint protest on First Lady
Laura Bush's National Book Festival on October 12 in Washington.

As the United Nations Security Council neared approval of a resolution
on Iraq, it appeared that Council resistance was giving way to rising US
pressure.

The New York City public school system doesn't have the money, time or
organizational skills to make sure every child has a dictionary--or a
desk.

In a weapons producing nation under Jesus
In the fabled crucible of the free world
Camera crews search for clues amid the detritus
And entertainment shapes the land

The man behind the "Jeffords Jump" is aiding Democratic efforts to stay on top.

Democrat Paul Wellstone, the only vulnerable incumbent senator to vote
against blank-check authorization to use force against Iraq, is locked
in one of the year's closest Senate contests.

Unions have improved their political game but are unhappy with the
results.

It's Friday afternoon in early October at the Working Families Party's
shabby but bustling headquarters in downtown Brooklyn, and no one is
going home early.

Governor Pataki's effective Gary Cooper imitation leaves Democrats in despair.

The house organ for America's political class is pushing Bush's case for war.

Six years ago, in 1996, the government of Guatemala and the guerrilla
groups it had fought bitterly for thirty-six years signed an ambitious
set of peace accords.

Coming as it did in the final weeks of a precarious re-election
campaign, incumbent German Chancellor Gerhard Schröder's resolute
"No" to German participation in any US-led war on Iraq was

Although I'm mad for Paul Thomas Anderson's new picture, Punch-Drunk
Love
, I also suspect it's made me a little crazy.

As one of the largest private employers in Africa, the Coca-Cola Company could
dramatically alter the course of HIV/AIDS.

US Sen. Paul Wellstone, D-Minnesota, is the Democrat the Bush administration loves to hate. White House political director Karl Rove personally selected Wellstone's Republican challenger in the November 5 election, former St. Paul Mayor Norm Coleman, and Vice President Dick Cheney and President George W. Bush have visited Minnesota again and again on Coleman's behalf.

But Minnesotans have not taken to the high-level pressure. Bush made a swing through the state last week on Coleman's behalf, but it was Wellstone whose poll numbers went up. Actually, Wellstone's numbers have been rising ever since he voted against the president's request for blank-check authorization to launch a war with Iraq. After months of too-close-to-call poll numbers, the headline of the Minneapolis Star-Tribune on Sunday announced, "Wellstone edges into lead in U.S. Senate race." The Star-Tribune's latest poll found the two-term liberal Democratic senator to be ahead by a 47-41 margin among likely voters.

But that doesn't mean Wellstone is sure to beat Bush, er, Coleman.After the poll results were released, a shadowy Virginia group that campaign finance analysts have linked to the Bush family and George W. Bush's 2000 campaign -- as well as to the insurance and pharmaceutical industries, former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott and the Republican Party -- made a record-breaking $1 million purchase of television and radio advertising time to attack Wellstone.