Books & the Arts

Gayl Jones’s Epic of Liberation

In her new novel, Jones offers a story of slavery and freedom in the Americas.

Farah Jasmine Griffin

John Rawls and Liberalism’s Selective Conscience

With its doctrine of fairness, A Theory of Justice transformed political philosophy. But what did it leave out? 

Olúfémi O. Táíwò

Denis Villeneuve’s Humanistic “Dune”

His adaptation was the first to understand the scale—both intimate and epic—the sci-fi novel required to translate to film.

Erin Schwartz

From the Magazine

The Expansive Feminism of Jacqueline Rose

The Expansive Feminism of Jacqueline Rose

Rose’s latest book, On Violence and On Violence Against Women, is a rigorous and capacious study of contemporary gender politics and solidarity.

Cora Currier
Francisco Goldman’s Altered States

Francisco Goldman’s Altered States

In his new novel, Goldman asks readers to question the very essence of how we define ourselves. 

Ed Morales
“Squid Game”’s Capitalist Parables

“Squid Game”’s Capitalist Parables

Netflix’s breakout series depicts a world of violent and macabre individualism and desperation.

E. Tammy Kim

Literary Criticism

Jonathan Franzen’s God

Jonathan Franzen’s God

A multigenerational saga about a Midwestern family, Crossroads is like most of Franzen novels—with one exception: Every plotline leads to the big guy himself.

Rumaan Alam
Brandon Taylor’s Potlucks and Parties

Brandon Taylor’s Potlucks and Parties

In his new collection of short stories, the Booker-Prize nominated novelist explores the desires and discontents of people living in small university towns. 

Jennifer Wilson
Sally Rooney’s Fiction for End Times

Sally Rooney’s Fiction for End Times

In her third novel, Rooney does more than just respond to critics; she surveys the wreckage of modern life.

Tony Tulathimutte

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History & Politics

David Graeber and David Wengrow’s Anarchist History of Humanity

David Graeber and David Wengrow’s Anarchist History of Humanity

In The Dawn of Everything, Graeber and Wengrow offer a sweeping and ambitious exploration of life without the state.

Daniel Immerwahr
In the Shadow of 9/11

In the Shadow of 9/11

Did the War on Terror put our democracy at risk—or reveal its flaws?

Samuel Moyn
Russia’s War Against the Cold

Russia’s War Against the Cold

A new history considers how the struggle with Siberia’s permafrost redefined the country.

Jennifer Wilson

Film

Joanna Hogg and the Art of Life

Joanna Hogg and the Art of Life

Her remarkable two-part film The Souvenir examines how an artist turns the fragments of their personal history into an enduring story.
Devika Girish

When does a life become a story, a narrative legible to those outside it? This question trills at the heart of Joanna Hogg’s The Souvenir (2019) and the new The Souvenir Part II, a two-part film à clef constructed like a precarious house of cards: memories, texts, and ephemera from… Continue Reading >

Ad Policy

Television and Films

Dave Chappelle’s Comedy of Bitterness

Dave Chappelle’s Comedy of Bitterness

In his recent special The Closer, and his response to critics of it, he outlines a strange version of identity politics where comedians are always the victims. 

Stephen Kearse
“Squid Game”’s Capitalist Parables

“Squid Game”’s Capitalist Parables

Netflix’s breakout series depicts a world of violent and macabre individualism and desperation.

E. Tammy Kim
Succession - Jeremy Strong

“Succession”’s Repetition Compulsion

In Succession’s moral universe, no one can ever get what they want or what they deserve.

Sam Adler-Bell

Politics

The Fuller Court.

Whose Side Is the Supreme Court On?

Many people who came of age in the 1950s and 60s view the Supreme Court as a force for good when it comes to race. But the court has often been the most anti-progressive branch of the federal government.
Randall Kennedy

Many people who came of age between, say, 1940 and 1970 have become accustomed to seeing the Supreme Court as a force for good when it comes to race. They have developed a faith in the justices’ claim, voiced in 1940 in a decision overturning the convictions of Black defendants… Continue Reading >

Poems

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