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Repeat after me: This is what democracy looks like!

Repeat after me: This is what history feels like!

A movement the think tanks thought unthinkable.

President Bush ended an hour-long summit in the Azores today by giving the UN a deadline of 24 hours to act on a resolution authorizing war with Iraq, marking an abrupt end to six months of feverish but failing diplomacy in which world opinion grew steadily against a US invasion.

With little hope of passing a resolution, Bush signaled his intention to flout the Security Council and quickly unleash the more than 250,000 US troops currently massed near the Iraqi border.

Yesterday's global antiwar protests, which again saw millions of people worldwide come out to express outrage at Bush's plans for war, could be just a hint of opposition to come if and when war begins. Tonight, evening peace vigils are taking place around the world, starting in New Zealand and following sequentially in time zones in more than 2,800 cities in 104 countries.

George Bush is not the only one who has to fight a two-front war in the months ahead. So do progressives who want to take power in 2004--and beyond.

No one has made life on the campaign trail more difficult for several of the frontrunning candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination than US Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa.

Last October, Harkin joined Massachusetts Senator John Kerry, North Carolina Senator John Edwards, Connecticut Senator Joseph Lieberman and Missouri Representative Richard Gephardt in voting for the resolution that authorized President Bush to take military action against Iraq. But, last week, Harkin admitted that he has been wrong to believe the Bush Administration was serious about exploring diplomatic alternatives to war.

If Congress were to vote again, Harkin said, he would oppose the resolution. "I'm not going to be fooled twice," the Iowan told hometown media in Des Moines. "As I look back it sure looks like the administration was never serious about resolving the situation peacefully," said Harkin, who complained that Bush has acted "like the cowboy who rode out of Texas, all guns blazing."

Much to the frustration of the Bush Administration, France, Russia,
China and the other members of the United Nations Security Council
opposing the British-US resolution on Iraq have not bought

The presidential contest has begun, as usual, with the "money primary,"
in which major donors choose their favorites and weed out other
candidates, long before any citizen has an opportunity to

One of the first casualties of war may be those happy-talk forecasts of
a robust recovery once the bombing starts in Iraq, but a far more
momentous economic question accompanies Bush's invasion

Let's say you have a war to sell. You have the usual public relations
tools at your disposal: highly scripted press conferences, stories
leaked by White House officials to a compliant press.

During the Vietnam War the heavyweight boxing champion of the world,
Muhammad Ali, refused to serve in the Army.

Whose name stands out like banners made of Day-Glo?
The State Union of Serbia and Montenegro!
What sounds as if it's jerry-built by Lego?

That Fox News Channel advertisement on the back cover is not a parody.
We know it's hard to believe, but it's a real ad, and they paid good
money to run it, too.

At last the leaders of the Democratic Party have moved decisively,
hauling out their ripest comminations and hurling them at--no, not at
George Bush.

It was a cold, gray morning, chance of flurries. As I braced for the
weather that's buffeted the East Coast recently, I thought: What a
spiraling blizzard of bad policy we face.

For more information about the Piquetero speaking tour of the United States, see
www.autonomista.org.

In these jittery times, many Americans see torture as justified.

Seen as the antiwar candidate, he shies away from being called a
liberal.

How an antiwar initiative is turning into a way to strengthen democracy.

Soothed by calm words, we are about to be driven into the flames of
hell.

In a provocative book published recently in Germany, a Hamburg scholar
named Klaus Briegleb appeared to take on the entire national literary
establishment for indulging in self-censorship of th

In the late summer and fall of 1997, small news leaks began appearing
that Mayor Edward Rendell of Philadelphia (who is now governor of
Pennsylvania) was thinking about suing the firearms indus

In about five years' time, there will be a new Paul Theroux travel book,
and it will look like this.

Almost a thousand boisterous supporters--most of them unionized Latino service workers--showed up on March 4 at the vote-counting and subsequent victory party for new City Councilman-elect Antoni

AD NAUSEAM II: FOX IN THE HENHOUSE