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In seven novels and a collection of essays published since 1981, Sarah Schulman has methodically chronicled the history of her longtime neighborhood, Manhattan's East Village.

Students across the country are gearing up to defend affirmative action on a national day of protest on February 24.

It is, depending on one's perspective, a delicious and redemptive scenario, a terrible nightmare or, if you are the escapist sort that hasn't yet cottoned to the hard reality of Election 2000, a

A man locks his daughters in a one-room house for their first twelve years. The girls--twins--don't attend school; they don't play with other kids. They're never even given a bath.

"Justice for Amadou Diallo!" has been the rallying cry throughout New York since four police officers gunned down the unarmed, 22-year-old West African immigrant as he stood outside his Bronx ap

From Blumenthal and Hitchens having lunch,

A sideshow has emerged that causes spec-

Ulation touching ethics and such things:

On February 26 last, my old friend Sidney Blumenthal emerged from the grand jury and made a bravura appearance on the courthouse steps in Washington, DC.

Free speech, Oliver Wendell Holmes famously declared, ought not to extend to falsely shouting fire in a crowded theater. But what are the limits on shouting across the wide-open Internet?

The week started with bipartisan babble about the need for an exit strategy.

Said the comic gangster in Payback, misquoting an old saw, "Don't shit where you eat. Or, I mean, where you live. That's it.

Haitians call secondhand clothes pèpè, pronounced "peh-peh." In an earlier time these were called Twoomann and Kenedi because it was under those US Presidents

If there's one thing everyone agrees on about Hawaii writer Lois-Ann Yamanaka, it's that she has a perfect ear for local pidgin dialects, which change cadence and idiom throughout the islands of

At lunch with a colleague who is devoted to the theater, the discussion turned to Broadway and she mentioned she had seen the revival of On the Town, the buoyant 1944 Comden and Gre

It might make sense to end it now, except

That wouldn't show the managers respect.

So even if their case now seems inert,

What happens to a leading Marxist writer after he gets a MacArthur genius grant, a Getty Fellowship, and his new book hits number one on the nonfiction bestseller list?

On the eve of the New York premiere of his

Symphony No.

When we put our faith in civil society, we are grasping at
straws.

When a young woman in high school frets about the folks in Mogadishu--when, for that matter, she can spell "Mogadishu"--American moviegoers know she needs a fashion makeover, a boyfriend and an

A short walk from my home in New Haven stands the farm of that prototypical Connecticut Yankee, Eli Whitney. In 1798 Whitney hit on a bold new scheme: interchangeable parts for muskets.


Time

magazine once diagnosed newspaper columnist, author, professor-at-large and Hugh Hefner sidekick Max Lerner (1902­92) as suffering from a "crush on America." Seven

In

The Spirit of the Laws
, Montesquieu draws a distinction that is useful in thinking about the impeachment of Bill Clinton.

As the impeachment trial was slouching toward completion, another issue began rising in prominence: Can Bill Clinton be indicted while he's President?

Some years ago, after I had completed a biography of the radical writer
Josephine Herbst, I gave serious thought to writing a biography of
Whittaker Chambers.