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This was intended to be a sweet little prewar column about an artist I
admire, Rosanne Cash.

Say what you will about oil and hegemony, but the pending invasion of
Iraq is more than just a geopolitical act. It's also the manifestation
of a cultural attitude.

Women's sports are under attack by jocks who have an ally in the President.

On June 4, 1961, John F. Kennedy held his last meeting with Soviet
leader Nikita Khrushchev in Vienna.

The revival of a highly regarded play can either enhance or diminish
its reputation.

A few years ago, when moviegoers in this country were just beginning to
learn about Abbas Kiarostami, I heard a crowd of New Yorkers berate him
for having put a snatch of Vivaldi onto a soundtr

John Steinbeck's forlorn protagonists, Lennie and George, summon few comparisons in today's landscape of mainstream literary fiction, overstocked with tales of redemption.


VENEZUELA'S CLASS WARFARE

New York City

Considering the fact that the Bush Administration is the planet's primary proponent of war with Iraq, Nancy Lessin wants to know why the US Congress has failed to follow the example of parliament

The Kurds are in the way again,
And so, to our dismay again,
If we begin a fray again,
As it appears we may again,
It seems we must betray again

There's nothing like a compelling icon when no compelling argument is
available.

So the truth is out: George W. Bush lied when he claimed to be worried about Iraq's alleged weapons of mass destruction.

This comfortable college town is defined as much by its eclecticism as its traditional Midwestern quintessence.

Below is a listing of key UN missions, embassies and consulates for
countries that the Bush Administration is leaning heavily on to secure a UN
resolution for war.

The day before MSNBC announced that it was pulling the plug on Phil Donahue's nightly show, the man who pretty much invented talk TV was interviewing actress and author Rosie O'Donnell.

The thirteen self-declared "citizen weapons
inspectors" marching down a rain-swept road just
outside Baltimore knew they weren't going to be
allowed inside the US military's Aberdeen Proving

The growing antiwar movement is building on the considerable momentum of the historic February 15 protests with a series of marches, petition drives, lobbying efforts and teach-ins planned for the weeks ahead.

The next major day of coordinated national actions is March 5 when a day of student strikes is planned by the National Youth and Student coalition; on International Women's Day, March 8 , thousands of people will converge on Washington, DC for a women-led rally and march to encircle the White House; on March 15 , a number of groups, led by International Answer, are organizing an emergency convergence at the White House, and the Win Without War coalitionis sponsoring innovative cyber-activism and creative antiwar advertising. Information on upcoming US events can be best be found at United for Peace and Justice and paxprotest.net. The best place to find out about European protests, in English, is the Stop the War coalition's website.

Join the Cities for Peace campaign, which has already persuaded one hundred and twenty-one cities and counties nationwide, including Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, Cleveland and Des Moines to issue antiwar resolutions. Local resolutions have no role, of course, in shaping federal policy, but they underscore the widespread opposition to US military action against Iraq and highlight the impact that war will have on city and state budgets. Click here for a full list of the citieswhich have passed resolutions to date and here for the Resolution Tool Kit.

As if there was need for more evidence that major media is neglecting to cover Federal Communications Commission deliberations on whether to fundamentally alter media ownership rules, a new survey shows that 72 percent of Americans know "nothing at all" about the debate in which FCC Commissioner Michael Copps says "fundamental values and democratic virtues are at stake."

Only four percent of 1,254 adults surveyed by the Project For Excellence in Journalism in collaboration with the Pew Research Center for the People and The Press said they had heard "a lot" about the FCC's deliberations regarding rule changes that could redefine the shape and scope of American media.

Echoing concerns voiced by consumer, public interest and labor groups, as well as a growing number of members of Congress, Copps has argued that the FCC should schedule more official hearings on the proposed rule changes. The commissioner also says that major media outlets -- especially the nation's television networks -- have a responsibility to cover the debate over whether to allow greater consolidation of media ownership at the national level and the removal of barriers to control by individual corporations of most of the television, radio and newspaper communications in particular communities.


SUDDENLY THERE CAME A TAPPING...

New York City

Brushing aside the world's largest antiwar demonstrations ever, the
United States, Britain and Spain have introduced a new United Nations
Security Council resolution that would in their view au

Just as his father did, George W. Bush is offering generous packages of
aid and arms to nations that join his drive for war against Iraq.