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Current US foreign policy is the most incoherent it has been in recent memory.

Any fan who over the years has attended a baseball game at Boston's
Fenway Park notices how few African-Americans are in the stands.

This book makes a good case for racism--the word, not the ideology. What
necessitated a defense?

Nothing is more galling to scientists than outsiders questioning their
research priorities.

The closest thing you get to a dull moment in Michael Moore's latest
picture, Bowling for Columbine, is an interview with Marilyn
Manson.

Within days of the April incursion of the Israel Defense Forces into Jenin, pro-Palestine activist Thomas Olson received first a trickle, then thousands, of e-mails with menacing subject lines su

The Washington Post front-page headline read, "Analysts Discount Attack by Iraq." The New York Times said, "CIA Warns That a US Attack May I...

In a speech intended to frighten the American people into supporting a war, the President Monday again trotted out his grim depiction of Saddam Hussein as a terrifying boogeyman haunting the worl

ActNow is aimed at helping people act on their beliefs. We hope to put readers in touch with projects and campaigns they may want to support as we feature creative ways for people to register informed dissent. Whether it's another rightwing Court appointment, a rush to war by a reckless Administration, a Governor with his finger on the switch, a Congress intent on pushing fast-track legislation, a corporate takeover of a public water concern or the steady erosion of unbranded public space, we'll help you find activists and organizers mobilizing effective opposition.

Even though he is unlikely to succeed in preventing a Congressional grant of blank-check warmaking powers to the Bush administration, Senator Robert Byrd, D-West Virginia, has done America the service of clarifying the issue at hand. Thanks to Byrd's fierce denunciations of an unnecessary resolution to promote an unnecessary war, members of Congress who side with the administration will not be able to plead ignorance to the charge that they abandoned their Constitutionally-mandated responsibilities in order to position themselves for the fall election.

Rarely in the history of the Senate has a member so bluntly identified the hypocrisy of the White House on a question of warmaking. But there was no partisan malice in Byrd's remarks. In a remarkable speech delivered as the Senate opened its debate on Bush's request for broad authority to use military force against Iraq, Byrd chastised his fellow Democrats for engaging in equally contemptible acts.

"The newly bellicose mood that permeates this White House is unfortunate, all the moreso because it is clearly motivated by campaign politics. Republicans are already running attack ads against Democrats on Iraq. Democrats favor fast approval of a resolution so they can change the subject to domestic economic problems," declared the senior Democratic senator. "Before risking the lives of American troops, all members of Congress -- Democrats and Republicans alike -- must overcome the siren song of political polls and focus strictly on the merits, not the politics, of this most serious issue."

On October 4 Ralph Nader's "Take it to The Street" campaign staged a rally on Wall Street against corporate corruption.

I wonder how Barbra Streisand feels.

On September 29, at the fancy Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles, she headlined a $6 million fundraiser for the Democ...

It sure smells like imperialism. That's the word historians use when powerful nations grab control of desired resources, be it the gold of the New World or the oil of the Middle East.


AN OPEN LETTER TO CALVIN TRILLIN

Democrats have rightly gone ballistic over the cynical White House
efforts to use Iraq to change the subject of the fall elections.

Democrats in Washington and New Jersey sighed with relief when
scandal-plagued Senator Robert Torricelli ended a doomed run for a
second term.

When Tony Blair rose to address a packed House of Commons on Saddam
Hussein's weapons of mass destruction, Albert Finney had just won an
Emmy for his performance as Winston Churchill in The

"I am here in the hope that we can do business," Minnesota Governor
Jesse Ventura told a Cuban audience after cutting the ceremonial ribbon
with Fidel Castro to open the recent US Food and Agri

The Torch could not make folks forget
The graft for which he's cited.
The only slogan left to use
Was "Never been indicted."

October surprises are built into our system, since elections come in
November. Cliffhanger movies in Hollywood's old days could not have
staged it better.

It's a scary little world right now. Such wars of careless words. Such
panic on every breeze. If Eskimos have a hundred words for snow, we have
let bloom a thousand words for fear.

Something about Al Gore brings out the worst in people, and nowhere is
this truer than in the so-called "liberal media." Journalists' "default"
position on Gore, Joe Klein notes, is "ridicule.