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The basic mistake of American policy in Iraq is not that the
Pentagon--believing the fairy tales told it by Iraqi exile groups and
overriding State Department advice--forgot, when planning "reg

Venezuela appeared to take a couple of steps closer to a recall
referendum on the presidency of Hugo Chávez in recent weeks, but
there is little chance that he will be removed by elector

While the national media gaze has fixed upon the battle to move a
two-and-a-half-ton Ten Commandments monument out of view in the state's
judiciary building, Alabama is about to have its most i

With its daily dominance of the headlines and a stellar cast from the
worlds of government, secret intelligence and the media, the Hutton
inquiry, playing here until the end of the month, is ea

Anniversaries are historical page markers; they denote a time to pause
and reflect.

"The nerve! Not so! That word still rankles."
"You're sinking. I can't see your ankles."
"The thugs are here; we now just squeeze."

(Update on "Sally Baron RIP")

The AP reports explaining that Wisconsite Baron's family had asked that memorials in her honor be made to any organization working for the removal of President Bush from office caught the attention of American citizens far from the verdant scenery of Wisconsin.

The Madison Capital Times reports that already "dozens of people from around the United States have written to the [paper] saying they will make donations." (People have even printed shirts featuring a photo of Baron.) And Keith Olberman's national coverage of the Baron family's request on MSNBC recently is sure to increase this number.

The Federal Communications Commission's attempt to implement rule changes that would permit big media companies to dramatically extend their control over communications in the United States hit a surprising and potentially major road block Wednesday, when the Third US Circuit Court of Appeals halted implementation of the new rules.

After a two-hour hearing, the three-judge panel voted unanimously to stay the effective date for implementation of the FCC's rewrite of the ownership regulation and ordered that the prior ownership rules remain in effect pending a judicial review of the new rules. "This is a matter of significant public interest," explained Circuit Judge Julio Fuentes, while Circuit Judge Thomas Ambro suggested that the delay was appropriate because the courts need to resolve "a difficult, serious question" of whether the public interest was threatened.

The appeals court ruling was a stunning victory for the Prometheus Radio Project, a Philadelphia-based media activist group that is part of the broad coalition that has opposed FCC chair Michael Powell's push to implement radical changes in the rules governing media ownership at the national and local level.

Look at America's leadership today. Tell me you wouldn't trade the whole mess of them for one good kindergarten teacher.


BURGLING IN BAGHDAD

New York City

In 1898, the Anti-Imperialist League was established to oppose America's territorial expansion, especially the "liberation" of the Philippines from Spain. Long before a President talked of an "axis of evil" and "regime change," or before Trent Lott and John Ashcroft accused critics of aiding the enemy, President William McKinley and his men attacked members of the League for opposing an America that projected its ideals abroad by force.

Imperialism, League members argued, was unjust, unnecessary and harmful to America's national interests. The league had a diverse membership featuring many respected public figures like Mark Twain, historian and industrialist Charles Francis Adams, Harvard professor and writer William James, financier Andrew Carnegie, reform journalist and senator Carl Schurz and The Nation's founding editor and prominent abolitionist E.L. Godkin.

League members drew a dramatic contrast between America's proud history as the land of liberty and its brutal repression of the Filipinos' struggle for independence. Such militaristic tyranny, they argued in their national platform, would ultimately erode the country's "fundamental principles and noblest ideals."

American experts urged the White House to be skeptical, but they hit a stone wall.

On Labor Day, the starting point for the mad rush to this winter's Democratic presidential caucuses and primaries, several of the Democratic contenders could point to support they have received from the unions and union members that will be critical to securing the party's nomination to challenge George W. Bush. By any measure, however, former House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt owns the bragging rights. With the endorsement he received August 20 from the 300,000-member Paper, Allied-Industrial, Chemical & Energy Workers (PACE) International Union, Gephardt now claims the support of a dozen major unions.

Gephardt is backed by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters; the United Steelworkers of America; the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers; the International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers; the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers; the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers; the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees; the American Maritime Officers; the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees; the Office and Professional Employees International Union; and the Seafarer`s International Union. That's an impressive list, drawn from unions with long histories of friendly relations with Gephardt, the son of a St. Louis Teamster who during the presidencies of George Herbert Walker Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush positioned himself as labor's best ally in Washington. "We know Gephardt," said PACE President Boyd Young, when he announced his union's endorsement. The ties between Gephardt and many labor leaders run deep, and they often run strong – having been forged in difficult struggles to block Congressional approval of trade pacts such as the North American Free Trade Agreement. When the 650,000-member steelworkers union endorsed Gephardt, it's president, Leo Gerard, described the Missouri congressman as someone who "shares our deeply-held conviction that America's trade policies are the cause of more than two million manufacturing jobs having been lost in recent years, and he has never failed to make the case, no matter the odds of victory."

That's high praise, indeed. But Gephardt will need more than kind words and the endorsements of a dozen unions to become "labor's candidate" in 2004. To secure the support of the AFL-CIO, which provided early and essential backing to Al Gore in his race against Bill Bradley for the Democratic nomination in 2000, Gephardt needs the backing of unions representing two-thirds of the labor federation's 13 million members. He does not have it now, and he's unlikely to gain it by October, when a meeting of the AFL-CIO's board, on which the president's of the 65 unions that make up the federation sit, could make the designation.

This was the summer when the movies were so bad, people were reduced to
complaining about a Mel Gibson film they hadn't seen.

In Plato's Republic, Socrates illustrates his theory of the parts
of the soul with the story of Leontius, who saw some corpses rotting
outside the walls of Athens and was torn between re

It is of some small comfort that totalitarian regimes are never quite as
total as either their leaders or subsequent historians might imagine.

Interesting Times is a curiously feeble title for an autobiography, rather as if Noam Chomsky were to write an article called "Could America Do Better?" It carries, of course, the sting

Workers have lost the right to organize. A new effort aims to get
it back.

Bush's "compassionate conservatism" is a deft--and dishonest--strategy.

An imperial errand is not so hard to begin, not so easy to complete.

"One has to be careful," said United Nations Secretary General Kofi
Annan in late August, "not to confuse the UN with the US." If the
Secretary General had taken his own advice, maybe his Brazi

The White House said, although it wasn't true,
Iraq must be invaded, PDQ,
Since terrorists, who'd caught us unaware,
Were with Iraq, and always gathered there.

This essay was one of the winners out of a pool of 290 entries in a recent writing contest sponsored by Women's WORLD, the Nation Institute and the Puffin Foundation designed to bring women's ideas on war and terror to wider public attention. (The prizewinning essays and some others are online at www.wworld.org.)

Through the corporate media's electronic collage of murders, sex
scandals, celebrity sightings and Pentagon-generated fantasy can be
heard a constant buzz--"war, terror, security"--but who know