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You would hope that the passage of fifty years might have cleared the
passions that once inflamed the Rosenberg case.

Toward the end of his memoir, My Brother's Keeper, Amitai Etzioni
recounts meeting with the political consultant Dick Morris.

Seattle is curbing greenhouse gases through more efficient power consumption.

Richard Falk, Mary Kaldor,
Carl Tham, Samantha Power,
Mahmood Mamdani, David Rieff,
Eric Rouleau, Zia Mian,
Ronald Steel, Stephen Holmes,
Ramesh Thakur, Stephen Zunes

If you want to date the beginning of conservative domination of the
opinion media, you could do worse than to pick Election Day 1964.

Every day, DNA testing overturns another man's rape or murder
conviction.

A small journalistic cottage industry has grown up demonstrating that
the Bush Administration took the nation to war against Iraq under false
pretenses.

Floyd Abrams, Laurence Tribe, Robin Williams, Margaret Cho, Martin
Garbus and others are supporting a petition asking New York State
Governor George Pataki to pardon legendary comedian Lenny Br

Dejectedly, a man sits on the ground.
The man has been detained. His hands are bound.
His crime is truly simple to explain:
Possessing pictures of Saddam Hussein.

Hawaii recently became the fifth state to make emergency contraception, also known as the morning-after pill, available directly from pharmacists. This is far from a small regulatory change.

Like Kaa the python in Disney's Jungle Book, Tony Blair has
staked his career on a single hypnotic refrain.

The Iranian student demonstrations that began on June 10 initially
protested plans to privatize Teheran University and to raise tuition.
They quickly became a forum for criticizing the repressi

It's no secret that Washington has a limited interest in the public
interest these days.

Eric Foner was an expert witness in Grutter v. Bollinger, the University of Michigan law school case.

In one of its most important cases in decades, the Supreme Court on June
23 upheld the prerogative of colleges and universities to give
preferences to members of minority groups in admissions.

The announcement this week by U.S. District Judge John S. Martin of the Southern District of New York that he would leave the bench because he was fed up with Congressional meddling in federal sentencing decisions highlights growing judicial resentment at the blurring of the separation of powers.

The founders of these United States established an independent federal judiciary with the intent that it would temper the excesses of the executive and legislative branches of government. In recent years, however, Congress has sought to restrict the ability of federal judges to make decisions based on law and reason.

Federal laws set mandatory minimum sentences for drug crimes, for using a gun in relation to various drug or violent crimes, and for numerous other offenses. Judges have for a number of years argued that adhering to sentencing mandates limits their ability to employ legal knowledge and discretion in determining appropriate punishments for men and women who have been convicted of crimes.

Whatever happens in Iraq, lying to Americans and the world about the reasons for war is not acceptable.

Earlier this month, The Nation and The Economist held a debate in New York City. Billed as "America's Role in the World: Protector or Predator," it was a wide-ranging discussion about US foreign policy, the Bush Administration, American intentions and neo-liberalism.

WNYC's Brian Lehrer was an artful moderator and Economist editor Bill Emmott a civil and informed adversary. While he and I disagreed on many issues, we did agree on the importance of independent media in this era of consolidation. CSPAN, which broadcast the debate on June 21, plans subsequent airings and is selling copies of the videotape on its website. (You can also listen and watch on your computer.) Below is an adapted version of my opening remarks:

These are perilous times, ones that raise large and fateful questions: What kind of country does the US want to be in the 21st century? Empire or Democracy? Global Leader or Global Cop? I believe that in pursuit of global dominance, the Bush Administration is endangering the world order abroad and the republic at home.

To the myth-makers of war, the Americans in Iraq look
like the Russians in Chechnya.

Emblematic of Chile's skewed democratic transition was the sight of congressional deputy Juan Pablo Letelier, probably one of the most honest and dedicated politicians in the country, behind bars

This fall will see a fact-finding mission to Iraq to evaluate the condition of workers and the status of the labor movement.

President Bush's support for Iranian student protesters reminds me of something a Russian friend said to me many years ago, during the Soviet era: "You Americans are an odd people. You love our dissidents, but you don't like your own dissidents. You should support your local dissidents, too."

Don't get me wrong. I think Americans should support Iran's student movement--while understanding that fundamental reform must come about peacefully, indigenously and without US interference. But I'd like to see a little respect for our own dissidents too.

On February 15th, when more than two million Americans protested the Administration's rush to war in Iraq, Bush contemptuously dismissed them as a "focus group." White House spokesman Ari Fleischer added that "Often the message of the protesters is contradicted by history." Millions of Americans who have opposed corporate globalization have been treated with even more derision.

Speaking at a conference this winter on Internet crime, eBay.com's director of law enforcement and compliance, Joseph Sullivan, offered law-enforcement officials extensive access to personal cust