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We're pleased to announce that this article, originally posted on September 14, 2004, has won the Deadline Club's Online News Exclusive for 2005, beating out Newsday and Business Week.

Research support for this article was provided by the Investigative Fund of the Nation Institute.

If there was ever any doubt that Ralph Nader's former supporters understand that redefeating Bush is the top priority for progressives in this election, it ended this morning when the overwhelming majority of Nader's 2000 National Citizens Committee issued a strong statement urging support for John Kerry and John Edwards in all swing states. (Click here to read the statement.)

Among the more than 75 signers are Phil Donahue, Noam Chomsky, Barbara Ehrenreich (who used one of her New York Times column to come out against Nader), Jim Hightower, Howard Zinn, Tim Robbins, Eddie Vedder, Susan Sarandon, Ben Cohen and Cornel West.

This urgent call comes at a time when it appears that the Nader campaign has qualified for the ballot in some 23 states, a minimum of 10 of which are considered swing states. Nader will probably also qualify for several other swing state ballots by the time of the election. In a race which remains both close and highly polarized, any one of these states could end up as the new "Florida," and tip the electoral college vote to Bush.

I used to have sympathy for Colin Powell, the supposed adult among the neocon kindergartners who pushed this nation into war in Iraq. Now I see him merely a...

This essay, from the May 10, 1971, issue of The Nation, is a special selection from The Nation Digital Archive. If you want to read everything The Nation has ever published on Vietnam and John Kerry, click here for information on how to acquire individual access to the Archive--an electronic database of every Nation article since 1865.

Nearly three years ago, September 11th Families for Peaceful Tomorrows was born out of a shared belief that America's military response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks "which took our loved ones' lives would result in the deaths of countless innocent civilians and increase recruitment for terrorist causes, making the United States, and the world, less safe and less free for generations to come."

Click here to read the full statement from Peaceful Tomorrows, issued on today's third anniversary of the tragic attacks, click here to listen to a BBC radio interview with Lisa Mullins, one of Peaceful Tomorrow's founders, and click here to help support the group's work.

MEDIA LINK: The Common Dreams site has put together a collection of archived articles published shortly after September 11, 2001. Click here to read pieces by Arundhati Roy, Barbara Kingsolver and Robert Fisk, among many others.

"As long as everyone is talking about what did or did not happen 35 years ago in Vietnam," writes Matt Miller, columnist and fellow at the Center for American Progress, "they're not talking about the candidates' rival visions for the future, or domestic policy differences between the parties that are huge."

Of course, the Bush campaign's scurrilous lies about Kerry's record as a war hero must be challenged forcefully. But what ever happened to the important debate about the costs of war in Iraq--we've just passed the grim milestone of 1000 US deaths-- particularly at a time in which poverty is rapidly growing?

In February 1968, when poverty and another war weighed heavily on people's minds, Robert F. Kennedy, as chairman of the Senate subcommittee on employment, manpower and poverty, held two field hearings in Eastern Kentucky to explore the causes of Appalachian poverty and gauge the success of Lyndon Johnson's anti-poverty programs.

I. It's My Birthday and I'll Lie if I Need To

Check out Williams's new book, Deserter: George W. Bush's War on Military Families, Veterans, and His Past. Click here to purchase a copy.

[UPDATE: The Washington Post reports that several document experts it consulted have raised questions about the authenticity of the Killian me...

Walking through the retrospective exhibition of Lee Bontecou, on view at MoMA-Queens, is uncannily like visiting an out-of-the-way museum of natural history, as if her entire work to date had bee

Caught up in a metaphorical swoon

by the oversoul in his head

War is on its last legs, he said.

The question is only How Soon.

Stalin continues to fascinate--the central mystery within the riddle inside the enigma that was the Soviet Union. If you Google "Stalin, biography," 166,000 websites come up.

In the spring of 1960, the year of his death, the novelist Richard Wright wrote from Paris to his friend and Dutch translator Margrit de Sablonière:

Guest workers in the US are routinely punished for asserting their rights.

Democrats hope demographic changes will translate into a win in November.

In an election strategy spawned from the events of 9/11, the Republicans challenged John Kerry by politicizing terror.

Since when are women--51 percent of the population--a special interest?

Who would you rather have in your corner, Sasso or Baker?

Auden had in mind the secondary worlds of literature, but as the Arendt quote indicates, his idea has wider application.

Back in the fog of war in Vietnam, LBJ super suckup Jack Valenti let the world know how he felt.

With the candidates in the bag, and no hope of drama, the Democratic and Republican conventions can be fairly judged only as extended advertisements for the parties that staged them.