Quantcast

Articles | The Nation

News and Features

It didn't take long for the press to connect 21-year-old white-supremacist multikiller Benjamin Smith with the all-purpose explanation du jour: violent entertainment, in this case the computer g

If Russia is not to dissolve like the Soviet Union or, worse yet, end in a cataclysm like Yugoslavia's, it must negotiate peacefully across a welter of emotional claims to self-determination.

Public scandals are America's favorite parlor sport. Learning about the flaws and misdeeds of the rich and famous seems to satisfy our egalitarian yearnings.

This book is aimed at business executives, but political reporters may have to read it too, now that Republican front-runner George W. Bush has decided that global warming is real after all.

It's 9:45 Tuesday night, and the house lights have just come on after the final scene of Wit--the surprise Off Broadway hit about a terminally ill English professor and her experience as a

In Summer of Sam, Spike Lee has made a small, shapely drama about two young Italian-American couples in the Bronx.

Almost three times as many people, most of them in tropical countries of the Third World, die of preventable, curable diseases as die of AIDS.

William Rehnquist may be the most patient and unyielding radical ever to occupy high office in America.

In early May, as the snows melted along the Karakoram Range, Indian troops on routine border patrols discovered that three strategic salients--Dras, Kargil and Batalik--in the Indian states of Ja

Despite the rosy projections and numerical alchemy that proponents employ to push their cause, privatizing Social Security won't build much wealth for women, and it will leave elderly women, part

If Webster Hubbell
Is out of trouble,
The end for Starr
Cannot be far.
We hope these guys
Live peaceful lives
With little fuss--

A new bride returns from a romantic honeymoon and opens a locked door in the family home, only to discover the mutilated corpses of her husband's six ex-wives.

"Why do you care so much?" said a white friend to me during a debate about suspect profiling. "Don't take it so personally--the police aren't after you in the black middle class.

Hossein, a young newspaper vendor, is a revolutionary.

A few years ago, one of Lebanon's giddier periodicals, suitably titled Prestige, published as its cover story an interview with a Lebanese celebrity.

Early in Hannibal, Thomas Harris's hungrily anticipated sequel to The Silence of the Lambs, an Italian chief investigator on the trail of Dr.

After the success of Infinite Jest in 1996, David Foster Wallace took a vacation from fiction and, perhaps, from fans' expectations with A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again.

Legend has it that Potemkin, burdened by duties and melancholy, once neglected to order the packing up of one of his stage-set villages.

If only Columbine High School had posted the Ten Commandments next to its football trophies, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold would never have killed anyone.

Nearly three years after the inauguration of welfare reform, Congress and the Clinton Administration would do well to reflect upon the admonition of Dorothy Day, the founder of the Catholic Worke

There's a bill speeding its way through Congress that would shred much of the protection against discrimination provided by the dozens of local and state gay civil rights laws.

So Holbrooke says he's sorry, though for what is not quite clear.
And Helms now says that Dick will get the post.
An envoy must do many deeds to forge a bright career.

It's always suspicious when Washingtonians start breaking into bad Latin. There may be a quid, you hear them say, and there seems to be a quo.

When Republican Senator Al D'Amato was endorsed for re-election last November by the Human Rights Campaign--the nation's wealthiest gay civil rights lobby--the HRC's appalling decision crystalliz