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Not only Democrats but many Greens oppose a Nader run in 2004.

The State Department, ignoring its own human rights reports, continues to assert that the Colombian government is complying with all conditions necessary for aid.

Forty-four states in the United States today bar people with mental illnesses from voting.

Nearly 5 million Americans can't vote because of felony convictions.

Click here for more info on why Paul Bremer's "reforms" in Iraq have been illegal to begin with. Compiled by Aaron Maté.

To gauge the level of hatred entertained by liberals for the Bush
Administration, take a look at the bestseller lists.

Early on the crisp morning of October 15, the archbishops of
thirty-seven of the thirty-eight provinces of the Anglican Communion
(known as primates) gathered in closed session at Lambeth Palac

The 52nd Congressional District of California, where I grew up,
encompasses the eastern suburbs of San Diego as well as a vast
hinterland of granite-bouldered mountains and almost impenetrable

The arrest last month of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the principal owner of
Russia's biggest oil company, Yukos, and the richest of the country's
seventeen state-anointed billionaire oligarchs, on ch

A day before the International Committee of the Red Cross announced it
would reduce its presence in Iraq because the country was becoming
increasingly dangerous, President Bush said he would ru

There will be a presidential election in a year, and it will come as no
surprise that we hope Election Night 2004 ends early with the defeat of
George W. Bush.

HELLO, HISTORY, GIMME REWRITE

The general says Islam's God's so small
He's just an idol, not a god at all.
The man's a moderate. Yes, you can cite
Much worse from zealots of the Christian right

KUDOS TO CORN

Cambridge, Mass.


PITY FOR RUSH?

Menomonie, WI

66 Things to Think About When We Watch The Reagans on Showtime.

As anyone reading today's papers knows, CBS (I hereby rename it the Craven Broadcasting System) announced yesterday that it had yanked "The Reagans" from its November lineup after being inundated with accusations from conservatives, led by Nancy Reagan, that it had done a hatchet job on the former president. (Click here to read Matt Bivens' survey of events leading to the docu-drama's cancellation.)

This latest media flap reminds me of the last time Reagan's name generated major controversy--back in 1998 when Washington DC's National Airport was renamed in honor of our 40th president. The Nation's Washington editor, David Corn, was inspired to publish a funny and enlightening editorial, which we've reprinted below.

Don't read this if you like Ann Coulter.

Don't read this if you want to believe Ann Coulter gets her facts straight.

The other night I was e...

Bush must reverse his misguided policy and get out of Iraq now.

The recent founding of the Committee for the Republic is yet another sign of how even mainstream members of the conservative elite are waking up to George W's (mis)leading of the country into ruin. Created to ignite a discussion in the establishment about America's lurch toward empire, the Committee includes numerous prominent Republicans, like former counsel to first President Bush C. Boyden Gray.

An explosive new documentary film offers far more proof, if any was still necessary, that the Bush Administration's extremism is severely compromising America's national security interests. That's why Rand Beers, a National Security Council adviser to five Presidential Administrations, including those of Reagan and Bush 41, recently resigned in disgust as Bush's special counterrorism assistant.

You can hear Beers make his case in "Uncovered: The Whole Truth About the Iraq War," a sixty-minute documentary directed and produced by award-winning film-maker Robert Greenwald. "Uncovered" takes you behind the scenes, as outraged CIA, Pentagon and foreign service experts reveal the lies, misstatements and exaggerations employed by the Bush Administration in the run-up to war.

I get fundraising solicitations all the time. At work. At home. In the mail. In my in-box. Over the phone. Sometimes over the fax.

I even got a letter from Vice President Dick Cheney subtly suggesting that, for a thousand bucks, I could be a "neighborhood leader." Wonder what my neighbors would say? (He actually started the letter by saying that I must have forgotten to answer the previous letter I got from the President. Sorry, Dick, I was busy writing my weblog exposing your Administration's numerous assaults on women.)

I get these invitations because I give once in awhile. There's no other choice right now--the polluters give, so do the HMOs and pharmaceutical giants, and the K Street crowd. If a progressive stands a chance, he or she's got to have some money. (There's little chance we can compete with corporate wealth, but that doesn't mean we should hamstring good people who are running.) But we shouldn't kid ourselves. If all we do is try to keep up in the money chase we'll never get anywhere. Money-intensive politics in a country where wealth is so unequally distributed will forever tilt against the majority.

Why do people consistently vote against their self-interest? Consider Alabama, where low-income people, who hardly benefit from tax cuts that jeopardize government services, recently voted down a referendum that tried to shift the burden from overtaxed working people to under-taxed business interests.

Alabama's citizens, as a New York Times editorial comment pointed out, voted "for fewer social services, less education, and a shoddier legal system--to become, that is, more like a third-world nation." Through a decision made by its own residents, Alabama is now entrenched at the bottom of the national rankings in government services.

The national landscape isn't much brighter. Is there some plausible explanation for why Americans support spending more on government programs like education and healthcare, express disappointment that the gap between rich and poor has widened, but then give their support to Bush's tax cuts, which disproportionately benefit the super-rich?

Dr. Marc Siegel calls for truth-telling.

State Senator and Deputy Minority Leader Eric Schneiderman is a politician New York Republicans love to hate. As the New York Observer put it: "Mr. Schneiderman's scrappy refusal to observe the traditions of Albany politics may earn him some short-term pain, but it also indicates the gritty stuff out of which New Yorkers mold their favorite politicians."

As one of the state's most important progressive voices on issues of social and economic justice, Schneiderman has led the successful effort to force the Senate to pass major gun control legislation and is a leading advocate for stronger environmental protections, increased funding for our city's schools and mass transit, and the reform of the draconian Rockefeller drug laws. He was also the lead attorney in litigation against the MTA to roll back the fare hike. Most recently, Schneiderman has been one of the most active opponents of the proposed charter revision to eliminate party primaries.

The Op-Ed below is adapted from a longer paper--compiling fifty years of scholarly political science research--showing starkly that "non-partisan" elections favor the elite, the wealthy and the Republican party.