Quantcast

Articles | The Nation

News and Features

Louis Begley is perhaps currently best known as the author of About
Schmidt
, the novel from which the recent acclaimed film starring
Jack Nicholson was adapted.

When George Kennan set out for the Caucasus in 1870, few if any Americans had explored the highlands of Dagestan, Chechnya and the wild frontiers of imperial Russia. And with good reason.

Bush's home is a damn peculiar place.

A small-town station in maine is proof that low-power radio builds
community.

Filmmaker and author Michael Moore wrote the foreword to A Right
to Be Hostile: The Boondocks Treasury
by Aaron McGruder, from which
the three cartoon strips are drawn. Copyright © 2003 by Aaron
McGruder. Published by arrangement with Three Rivers Press, a division
of Random House, Inc.

Click here for info on Alterman's best-selling book What Liberal Media: The Truth About Bias and the News

Why is it that "think pieces" about women and work and kids and marriage
always leave one suspecting that the minute these
corporate-lawyers-turned-stay-at-home-moms hang up the phone on the
r

A new justification for our war on Iraq has been born out of the war
itself.

The tens of thousands of Bolivians in the streets in October demanding
the resignation of President (now ex-) Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada came
from all walks of life and included teachers, health

Even as the labor leaders who support him are redoubling efforts to
secure the Democratic presidential nod for Dick Gephardt, it is becoming
increasingly clear that the former House minority le

An explosive legal obstacle, currently ignored, lurks beneath the
surface of the Iraq war debate--international law likely to ensnare and
possibly crumple the American conqueror's grandiose pla

In response to the news that coordinated suicide bombs in Baghdad had
killed several dozen people and wounded 200, George W. Bush pointed to
the attacks as a sign of success.

As the 2004 election draws nearer and George W. Bush's poll numbers grow
shakier, White House operatives are devoting themselves to coddling the
religious right.

EDWARD SAID

Long Island City, NY

Virtually ignored amid boosterish reports of the $13 billion in pledges and grants for Iraq secured by the US at the Madrid conference were the consequences for other impoverished regions. Development officials say that the sums cited by the World Bank and the US as necessary to meet Iraq's needs over four or five years (between $33 and 55 billion) dwarf what other poor, war-torn countries have received in the modern history of aid projects. It could also mean that what aid there is for these countries would effectively dry up.

As economist Jeffrey Sachs recently pointed out, it's crucial that the world development agenda be set by the world, not by the US alone. The Bush Administration obsessively views "every problem through the lens of terror and accordingly considers itself excused from the struggle against poverty, environmental degradation and disease."

As Sachs rightly argues, "The irony is that without solutions to these problems, terrorism is bound to worsen, no matter how many soldiers are thrown at it." More alarming, Sachs continues, "at the same time, the US is starving international initiatives in disease control, development assistance and environmental improvement."

As the Bush White House juggles two political grenades--the Wilson leak and the MIA WMDs--there are two questions: can Bush and his gang prevent detonations...

Nation interns march in New York City and Washington, DC.

As long as firms are willing to hire them, immigrants will come.

From the valuable listserv, " Democracy Dispatches," a project of Demos--the New York City-based Public Policy and Advocacy organization, which tracks and analyzes democracy issues in the states, comes news of a novel way to boost voter turnout.

The " Voter Reward" initiative in Arizona is designed to motivate people to vote by entering those who have cast ballots into a random drawing with a $1 million jackpot. (Before implementing the program, it would be necessary to change the Arizona law, which currently makes it illegal to pay people to get them to vote.)

Mark Osterloh, who helped pass the Arizona Clean Elections statute, is also the mastermind behind this idea. "Opponents will say we are bribing people to vote," he says. "We are not. What we are doing is rewarding behavior we want to encourage. The 'Voter Reward' program is not bribery; it is capitalism at its best." What's next? A recording contract and chance to sing on TV in return for pulling the lever?