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Maybe it's the summer heat, but I thought I was hallucinating when I picked up Monday's Washington Post and read the headline, "Democrats Not Shying Away from Tax Talk."

It seems like common sense to me, but for decades Dems have shied away from the T-issue for fear of being called soft on tax increases. But it turns out that Democratic pollster Stan Greenberg has recent numbers suggesting that taxes can be a good issue for Democrats.

While voters still are likely to believe that Republicans have a more favorable position on taxes generally, they support Democratic efforts to close corporate loopholes and to make the tax system fairer.

This essay, from the September 5, 1953 issue, is a special selection from The Nation Digital Archive. If you want to read everything The Nation has ever published on Iran, click here for information on how to acquire individual access to the Archive--an electronic database of every Nation article ever.

If you want to read everything The Nation has ever published on Plan Colombia, the War on Drugs and US drug policy, click here for information on how to acquire individual access to The Nation Digital Archive.

If you've seen Pleasantville--the story of teenagers who are
magically transported from 1990s reality into 1950s television--you know
that its writer-director, Gary Ross, has a sly respe

If the idea of monochrome painting occurred to anyone before the
twentieth century, it would have been understood as a picture of a
monochrome reality, and probably taken as a joke.

In March 2001 a small Internet website in Delhi, tehelka.com, revealed
that two of its reporters had used a secret camera to tape senior
defense officials and political leaders accepting bribes

Pop music's eternal appeal can be found in one instance out of many:
"This Magic Moment," a 1960 song by The Drifters.

American troops have been in Iraq since March, and their reception has
been decidedly chillier than promised.

Click here to read Iran's New Strong Man by Andrew Roth from the September 5, 1953 issue of The Nation.

Korey Capozza received a grant from the Fund for Investigative Journalism to
research this article.

Washington continues to evade responsibility for forty-seven years of contamination.

The Rev. Franklin Graham ought to visit Sarajevo.

A budget crisis and a prison boom make the states a vanguard for drug reform.

On a frigid morning in Washington, DC, two boys about 13 or 14 come to
the driveway of the Ambassador Baptist Church, where the day's meager
food offerings are displayed.

Washington no longer feels it ought to insure that everyone has enough to eat.

As questions grow, so does bush's vulnerability.

Week after week Bush and his people have been getting pounded by newly
emboldened Democrats and liberal pundits for having exaggerated the
threat posed by Saddam Hussein and his still-elusive w

(From the new musical by George Bush & Karl Rove, The Buck
Stops There.)

The revolution may, in fact, be televised--and on C-Span, no less.

Watch for William Greider's forthcoming book The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy, due in bookstores in early September. Click here for info on the book and original reflections and riffs from Greider.

An odd thing happened in February when a European television station
approached Richard Perle for an interview.

If you want to read everything The Nation has ever published on Iraq, click here for information on how to acquire individual access to The Nation Digital Archive.