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Just in case you didn't have a clue who George W.

Two major lawsuits--filed in the United States against multinational
corporations including GM, IBM and Citigroup for aiding and abetting
apartheid--are at a critical juncture.

Senate Democrats, who were so divided on the war and tax cuts, are
holding together impressively to stop the Worst of the Worst of
President Bush's judicial nominees.

John Nichols and Robert W.
McChesney are founders of the media-reform
network Free Press, one of the groups named in this article.

When Bush (sans flight suit) delivered a photo-op victory speech to the
men and women of the USS Abraham Lincoln, he solemnly noted, "We've
begun the search for hidden chemical and biological w

The suicide attacks in Riyadh, which Saudi officials blamed on Al Qaeda,
were barbarous acts.

The new UN resolution doesn't even try to bring the Iraqi occupation into line with international law.


LEGITIMATE? I THINK NOT

The Bronx, NY

The Department of Homeland Security's Air and Marine Interdiction Division (AMID) says its mission is to "Protect the Nation's borders and the American people from the smuggling of narcotics and other contraband with an integrated and coordinated air and marine interdiction force."

So it is easy to understand why Texans were scratching their heads when they learned that the division's Air and Marine Interdiction and Coordination Center in Riverside, California, played a critical role in tracking down the Democratic legislators who went missing from the Texas Capitol this week.

The revelation that the federal anti-terrorism agency joined the Republican-sponsored hunt for the Texas legislators has sparked a fury in Austin and in Washington. While the Texas Democratic Party is calling for an accounting of all the state and federal resources employed in the partisan dragnet, Congressional Democrats in Washington are demanding to know how and why a Department of Homeland Security tracking center in California was pulled into the service of the Republican leadership in the Texas State House.

US troops transformed the ancient site of Ur into a base, even digging trenches into the ground.

It turns out the threat is not from Iraq but from us.

What is it with neocon women? They'll find any opportunity to bash the upper west side. In last Friday's Wall Street Journal, former Dan Quayle speech-writer and charter member of the rightwing, antifeminist Independent Women's Forum Lisa Schiffren shared her sex fantasies:

"I had the most astonishing thought last Thursday. After a long day of hauling the kids to playdates and ballet, I turned on the news. And there was the president, landing on the deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln, stepping out of a fighter jet in that amazing uniform, looking--how to put it?--really hot. Also, presidential, of course. Not to mention credible as a commander in chief. But mostly 'hot' as in virile, sexy and powerful. You don't see that a lot in my neighborhood, the Upper West Side of Manhattan. (I'm told there's more of it in the 'red' states.)"

Lisa, Lisa, Lisa, where are you hanging out? Not in my neighborhood, my upper west side. Haven't you walked through Riverside Park this spring? Checked out the running paths and soccer fields? What about the basketball courts at 92nd and Amsterdam?

I was surprised when the producer from Chris Matthews' MSNBC show Hardball said they wanted me to talk about the controversy surrounding sportswriter Bob Ryan. Maybe I shouldn't have been, what with Michael Jordan as front page news in the Washington Post, and the increased politicization of sports generally--remember Manhattanville College basketball player Toni Smith's now-famous antiwar protest? And, more recently, there was the delicious controversy over the banning of a showing of "Bull Durham" by the Baseball Hall of Fame because of Tim Robbins' antiwar statements. Plus, the NBA playoffs are currently in full-swing, as I know from my basketball-obsessed family. (My twelve year old daughter begins every morning by reading the sports pages.)

It seems Ryan, a venerable Boston Globe sports columnist, set off a firestorm when he said on a local sports TV show that he'd like to "smack" Joumana Kidd, wife of New Jersey Nets star point guard Jason Kidd, whose team, is currently locked in a bitter playoff battle with the Boston Celtics. The comment was particularly insensitive because two years ago Kidd was arrested for striking his wife in a widely-publicized domestic violence incident. After criticism mounted, the Globe quickly suspended Ryan for one month without pay. "Bob Ryan's comments were "offensive and unacceptable," said Martin Baron, the editor of the Globe.

Speaking as a woman, I do find Ryan's comment offensive, cruel and insensitive to the issue of domestic abuse. But, as an editor, I am troubled by suspending a columnist for mean and offensive language. It seems to me that columnists have a certain license, and nothing Ryan said made it impossible for him to continue his work. And while his comments--made on talk radio, not in his column--made the Boston Globe look bad that's not a reason, to me, to suspend him.

Several staggered rows of grayish papier-mâum;ché headstones have sprouted on the grassy quad of Santa Monica College--the crown jewel of Southern California's once envied and now bat

LONDON - Frustrated by the failure of US-based broadcast networks to provide a realistic account of the political machinations that led to the Iraq war, millions of Americans tuned in British news reports - which were picked up on public broadcasting and community radio, the internet and television stations.

Already high American audience figures for BBC World News bulletins spiked by 28 percent in the first weeks of the war, and BBC officials delighted in e-mails like the one from a New York viewer who wrote, "The BBC seems to be the only decent source of news on this conflict. American networks are appalling."

While Americans expressed admiration for the BBC's straight take on the news, British viewers who caught reports from US broadcast and cable networks have been shocked by the bias that permeates coverage of the Bush Administration and its military adventurism abroad. The general director of the BBC bemoaned the "gung ho" coverage of the US networks while a veteran British Cabinet minister dismissed US news coverage of the war as "old-fashioned propaganda."

See also Tim Shorrock's March 2002 story for The Nation
on the Carlyle Group.

The announcement a few weeks ago that Partisan Review was closing
shop after a run of nearly seventy years brought sadness--since
PR at its best was a central site of American cul

In the current national climate, the notion that Washington might learn
from the experience of former Soviet leaders Nikita Khrushchev or
Mikhail Gorbachev would strike most as ludicrous.

It is agonizingly difficult to write about one's hometown as it drowns
in flames and suffocates with smoke.

As unemployment soars, many workers are rethinking their libertarian views.

Why has it taken so long for the Pentagon and the Bush Administration to seriously search for weapons of mass destruction?

At a Pentagon press confe...

In the name of fighting terrorism, the Army has established a domestic command.

Defying US policy, they save the lives of illegal migrants, a cup of water at a time.