Books & the Arts / February 20, 2024

Jonah

Tomaž Šalamun

how does the sun set?
like snow
what color is the sea?
wide
Jonah are you salty?
I’m salty
Jonah are you a flag?
I’m a flag
all the fireflies are resting

what are the stones like?
green
how do doggies play?
like the poppy
Jonah are you a fish?
I’m a fish
Jonah are you a sea urchin?
I’m a sea urchin
listen to the murmur

Jonah is the roe rushing through the forest
Jonah am I watching the mountain breathe
Jonah are all the houses
have you heard about the rainbow?
what is dew like?
are you asleep?

(Translated from the Slovenian by Brian Henry)

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