Poems / January 29, 2024

from Earth’s Last Word (A superstitious poem)

Valerie Hsiung

Dear reader,

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Valerie Hsiung

Valerie Hsiung is the author of multiple poetry and hybrid writing collections, including The Naif (Ugly Duckling Presse, forthcoming 2024), The only name we can call it now is not its only name (Counterpath), To love an artist (Essay Press), selected by Renee Gladman for the 2021 Essay Press Book Prize, and outside voices, please (CSU), selected for the 2019 CSU Open Book Prize. Born in the Year of the Earth Snake and raised by Chinese-Taiwanese immigrants in Cincinnati, Ohio, she now lives in the mountains of Colorado where she teaches as Assistant Professor of Creative Writing & Poetics at Naropa’s Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics.

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