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Autobiography and Memoir

Autobiography and Memoir news and analysis from The Nation

  • May 4, 2005

    In Our Orbit

    Victor Navasky’s new memoir of opinion journalism.

    The Nation

  • April 14, 2005

    Another Country

    A review of two recent memoirs of Iran.

    Meline Toumani

  • April 7, 2005

    Tangled Up in Bob

    In or around 1965, human nature changed.

    David Yaffe

  • February 17, 2005

    Dazed and Confused

    Perhaps no cultural phenomenon has been as successful at demonizing alcohol as MTV’s The Real World. Watch it sometime. You’ll never want to drink again.

    Suzy Hansen

  • November 24, 2004

    Lost in America

    In no literature in the world has the immigrant novel been more varied, more original, more persistent than in ours–and this for the most obvious of reasons.

    Vivian Gornick

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  • September 30, 2004

    The Enigma of Return

    In the largest exodus in recorded history, millions of refugees migrated across the brand new border after India was partitioned in 1947.

    Amitava Kumar

  • August 26, 2004

    The Life of the Mind

    Isaiah Berlin once told his biographer, Michael Ignatieff, that “I have a natural tendency to gossip, to describing things, to noticing things, to interest in human beings and their characters, t

    Sunil Khilnani

  • July 15, 2004

    Living to Tell the Tale

    Former Presidents have a difficult, even awkward, role. They cope in different ways, but if the past half-century is any guide, we can be certain of one thing: They write their memoirs.

    Stanley I. Kutler

  • June 24, 2004

    The Searcher

    In 1965, nearly forty years before the publication of Where I Was From, her most recent and most sustained meditation on her native state of California, Joan Didion wrote “John Wayne: A Love Song.” 

    Hilton Als

  • April 29, 2004

    Unforgettable

    “This is a book written in the presence of music.” So begins Geoffrey O’Brien’s sprawling memoir-cum-critical essay, and the reader is tempted to ask: What book isn’t?

    Jody Rosen

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