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February 9, 2004 | The Nation

In the Magazine

February 9, 2004

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William Greider listens to Paul O'Neill, Patricia J. Williams issues a memo from Mars and Robin Blackburn considers 1968.

Letters


FOODIE BLUES

Los Angeles

Editorials

Readers consistently rate the environment as one of their greatest concerns.

"The environment is probably the single issue on which Republicans in general--and President Bush in particular--are most vulnerable." So asserted Frank Luntz, a leading Republican pollster, last

For those with a taste for learning the inner truth about White House politics, reading Paul O'Neill's story is like eating a bowl of peanuts--difficult to stop.

Everything about Howard Dean's "Iowa Perfect Storm" strategy seemed to go perfectly, right up to the point at which Iowans actually started voting in the first-in-the-nation caucuses that began t

George W. Bush's State of the Union speech clearly signaled that he plans to run as a wartime, prosperity candidate.

Columns

My dear friend and late Nation colleague Andrew Kopkind liked to tell how, skiing in Aspen at the height of the Vietnam War, he came round a bend and saw another skier, Defense Secretary R

It now appears that they saw 9/11
As, even though not quite ordained in heaven
To punish godless sins allowed in bed
(As Falwell and Pat Robertson had said),

Articles

A vast impoverished population languishes in the midst of our economy.

Democrats need to offer a compelling vision of a morally based social contract.

A call to global activists meeting in India.

Why Martha Stewart should be found innocent.

Books & the Arts

Book

Robin Blackburn spent 1968 in Havana, Prague, Berlin and London.

Book

The afterlife of Italian poet, novelist, critic and filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini brings to mind some familiar lines from Auden's "In Memory of W.B.

Book

Colin MacCabe's new book is more a provocative polemic than a rounded biography, but it deserves the highest praise for being inspired by the belief that in the early 1960s Jean-Luc Godard grabbe