Quantcast

Victor Navasky | The Nation

Victor Navasky

Author Bios

Victor Navasky

Publisher Emeritus

Victor Navasky, publisher emeritus of The Nation, was the magazine's editor from 1978 to 1995 and publisher and editorial director from 1995 to 2005. In 1994, while on a year's leave of absence, he served first as a fellow at the Institute of Politics at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and then as a senior fellow at the Freedom Forum Media Studies Center at Columbia University.

Before coming to The Nation he was an editor at The New York Times Magazine and wrote a monthly column about the publishing business ("In Cold Print") for the New York Times Book Review. He is the author of Kennedy Justice (Atheneum, 1977), the American Book Award winner Naming Names and, most recently, A Matter of Opinion. He is co-author with Christopher Cerf of The Experts Speak: The Definitive Compendium of Authoritative Misinformation, now in its second edition.

Navasky has also served as a Guggenheim Fellow, a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation and Ferris Visiting Professor of Journalism at Princeton. He has taught at a number of colleges and universities and has contributed articles and reviews to numerous magazines and journals of opinion. He is a graduate of Yale Law School (1959) and Swarthmore College (1954), where he was Phi Beta Kappa with high honors in the social sciences.

In addition to his Nation responsibilities, Navasky is also director of the George Delacorte Delacorte Center for Magazine Journalism at Columbia University and a regular commentator on the public radio program Marketplace.

Mr. Navasky, who has three children, lives in New York City with his wife, Anne. He serves on the boards of the Authors Guild, PEN and the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Articles

News and Features

He was a passionate purist in his prose, his populist politics and his expectations of others and himself.

An excerpt from Victor Navasky's The O'Dell File reveals the story of the civil rights movement's 'unsung hero' who has been wrongly written out of the pages of history.

For decades, first at Pantheon and then at the New Press, he was a lion of progressive publishing.

How did Lillian Hellman become the archetype of hypocrisy?

The Nation’s longest-running columnist was a witty, brilliant, coruscating presence in our pages for almost thirty years.

Thank you for casting us in your life.

A real 'Mad Man' who dreamed up and helped found the Leadership Network, a mini-advertising consortium that enabled mega-corporations to advertise in small-circulation journals of opinion.

“Christopher had a twenty-five-year adventure with The Nation that I hope was as rewarding for him as it was for us, despite the political collisions.”

Most journalists think that words are more important than images. Barbie Zelizer thinks they are wrong.