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America After 9/11 | The Nation

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America After 9/11

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Protest against NYPD surveillance

A protest against the New York Police Department's surveillance of Muslim communities (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

Since 9/11, the Department of Justice has prosecuted more than 500 terrorism cases, yet there remains scant public understanding of what these federal cases have actually looked like and the impact they have had on communities and families. Published by The Nation in collaboration with Educators for Civil Liberties, the America After 9/11 series features contributions from scholars, researchers and advocates to provide a systematic look at the patterns of civil rights abuses in the United States’ domestic “war on terror.”

Why Has President Obama Deported More Immigrants Than Any President in US History? Since 9/11, immigration has become increasingly tangled with criminal enforcement and national security. 
by Alejandra Marchevsky and Beth Baker

How a British Citizen Was Stripped of His Citizenship, Then Sent to a Manhattan Prison: Britain’s citizenship deprivation processes may help obscure the Obama Administration's willingness to kill and kidnap Britons.
by Aviva Stahl

The Torture That Flourishes From Gitmo to an American Supermax: A civil rights attorney reports from the belly of the post-9/11 justice system. 
by Pardiss Kebriaei

Five Years Ago, Obama Pledged to End Torture. He Still Hasn’t: Waterboarding may have ended, but the US continues to torture terrorism suspects in American prisons. 
by Sally Eberhardt and Jeanne Theoharis

Guantánamo in New York CityAmericans remain mostly blind to the abusive treatment of terror suspects on US soil.
by Jeanne Theoharis

Censored in ColoradoWhy did a Colorado prison prevent Fahad Hashmi from reading a Nation article about his incarceration?
by Jeanne Theoharis

Where’s the Outrage When the FBI Targets Muslims? The FBI employs the same repressive tactics as the NYPD in its broad surveillance of Muslim communities. Why does the FBI get a pass?
by Diala Shamas

How Mohammed Warsame Became an Accidental ‘Terrorist’In the wake of 9/11, prosecutors have embraced “special administrative measures” to keep terrorism suspects guilty until proven otherwise.
by David Thomas

How Tarek Mehanna Went to Prison for a Thought CrimeAs the government embraces a “counter-radicalization” approach to counter-terrorism, prosecutors are turning radical beliefs into criminal acts.
by Amna Akbar

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