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September 19, 2005

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  • Editorials

    A Guide to Grassroots Charities

    There's abundant compassion but a great deal of confusion about the best places to send charitable donations to help the victims of Hurricane Katrina.

    Adam Howard

  • Grassroots Charities Need Your Help

    Progressive, grassroots charities on the Gulf Coast are poised to help hurricane victims. Here's a list of groups that need your donations.

    Katha Pollitt

  • The Power of Outrage

    A nation's conscience is stirred by the abandonment of the poor and the frail: This may be the one bright spot of the man-made disaster on the Gulf Coast. Eric Foner gives a history lesson.

    Eric Foner

  • In Rehnquist’s Footsteps

    The death of William Rehnquist, the nomination of John G. Roberts Jr. to replace him and the agony of New Orleans represent a sad symmetry of events.

    Bruce Shapiro

  • To Return and Rise Again

    Louisiana's poet laureate writes of the resolve of New Orleans's displaced citizens to rebuild their shattered city.

    Brenda Marie Osbey

  • Honor Their Sacrifice

    Mounting American casualties alone cannot turn us away from this ill-advised war. Democrats and anti-war advocates should let words and peaceful actions speak, instead of guns and corpses.

    Jonathan Schell

  • Messing With Mother Nature

    Rush Limbaugh would should skip the juvenile hurricane jokes and summon up some genuine empathy for the victims of Hurricane Katrina.

    Katrina vanden Heuvel

  • Spying on the Protesters

    It's déjà-vu all over again: National Guard units and federal, state and local law enforcement are spying on antiwar activists.

    John S. Friedman

  • Roberts, Without Illusions

    As confirmation hearings open, we already know a great deal about John G. Roberts Jr. He's ethically challenged, ideologically rigid and unfit for the Supreme Court.

    the Editors

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  • Books and the Arts

    The Power of Outrage

    A nation's conscience is stirred by the abandonment of the poor and the frail: This may be the one bright spot of the man-made disaster on the Gulf Coast. Eric Foner gives a history lesson.

    Eric Foner

  • Kanye West, Unplugged

    NBC took offense when Kanye West took an unscripted swipe at President Bush during a benefit concert for hurricane victims. But somebody had to say it.

    Adam Howard

  • To Return and Rise Again

    Louisiana's poet laureate writes of the resolve of New Orleans's displaced citizens to rebuild their shattered city.

    Brenda Marie Osbey

  • Tramps Like Us

    Thirty summers ago, Bruce Springsteen's Born to Run exploded the cynicism and complacency of a morally exhausted era and gave a new generation reason to believe in rock and roll.

    Eric Alterman

  • The American Sublime

    Robert Smithson's epic earthwork, Spiral Jetty tends to render critics speechless.

    Arthur C. Danto

  • Good Vibrations

    Orgasms used to be a secret, then they became a right. Now they're a duty. It's time to explode the myths.

    Cristina Nehring

  • Requiem for a Dream

    Daniel Fuchs's The Golden West is best read as an author's requiem for the Hollywood he loved.

    David L. Ulin

  • Optimism of the Will

    The rich legacy of former Nation editor and activist Carey McWilliams is on full display in three books.

    Mike Davis

  • A Robertson Republican

    Bush's paean to his staunchest ally's murderous impulses, with apologies to Gilbert & Sullivan.

    Calvin Trillin

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