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February 17, 2003 Issue

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  • Editorial

    Powell’s UN Presentation

    Secretary of State Colin Powell's presentation wasn't likely to win over anyone not already on his side.

    Phyllis Bennis

  • ‘Random’ Destruction

    Once again, changes at Random House have made headlines in papers throughout the country.

    André Schiffrin

  • Irene Diamond

    Irene Diamond, who died recently at 92, was an innovative philanthropist, ever ready to bet on an unlikely cause.

    the Editors

  • Copyright Monopolies

    Big Media won another battle in the escalating war over copyright on January 15, when the Supreme Court upheld a 1998 law extending copyright terms by twenty years, to life plus seventy years f

    Andrew L. Shapiro

  • The New Imperialism

    In my days as a student activist in the 1970s, the use of the term "imperialism" to describe US policy was generally used only in the antiwar and international solidarity movements, the writing

    William D. Hartung

  • Undermining the UN

    The long-awaited January 27 report of United Nations inspection chiefs Hans Blix and Mohamed ElBaradei, as anticipated, did not include a clear-cut finding of success and readiness to close the

    Phyllis Bennis

  • Bush’s Gulf of Credibility

    Bush's Gulf of Credibility

    The President's State of the Union address deepened the gulf between word and deed. Poll-tested packaging hid the untruths within.

    the Editors
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  • Books & the Arts

    ‘What Silent Love Hath Writ’

    At the Brooklyn Academy of Music this month, the Harvey Theater reclaims its original name--the Majestic--with the arrival of director Sam Mendes's beautiful renderings of Chekhov's Uncle Va

    Carol Rocamora

  • Among the Lotus-Eaters

    In 1886 the British are fighting an imperial war on another continent with the express goal of suppressing and maintaining control of the natives. Sound familiar?

    Dr. Marc Siegel

  • Death at an Early Age

    In October 1968, at the height of the Ocean Hill-Brownsville crisis, New York Mayor John Lindsay got heckled off the stage at a synagogue in Brooklyn.

    Michael E. Staub

  • Jump at de Sun

    Anthropologist, novelist, folklorist, essayist and luminary of the Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neale Hurston dazzled her peers and patrons almost immediately upon her arrival in New York City in 1

    Kristal Brent Zook


  • ‘Random’ Destruction

    Once again, changes at Random House have made headlines in papers throughout the country.

    André Schiffrin

  • The New Imperialism

    In my days as a student activist in the 1970s, the use of the term "imperialism" to describe US policy was generally used only in the antiwar and international solidarity movements, the writing

    William D. Hartung
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