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November 8, 2004 | The Nation

In the Magazine

November 8, 2004

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The Nation endorses John Kerry, Alisa Solomon argues that art makes a difference and Jody Rosen praises Tom Waits and Björk.

Letters


RACE AGAINST THE MACHINE

Albany, NY

Editorials

This election is a referendum on William
Rehnquist's Supreme Court.

FIVE-OH FOR THE OBSERVER

The presidential campaign debates are over, and the time for decision has come. The Nation endorses Senator John Kerry to be the next President of the United States.

In Senate races across the country, Republicans are falling behind.

Apocalyptic language intensifies, but the election may be less definitive than many think.

Columns

scheer

It's Cheney's Administration, and it's a shame.

Music

Reservists mutiny in Iraq, old people keel over standing in line for flu shots and all sorts of cats leap out of Bush's bag of secrets: According to Ron Suskind's revelatory New York Times Mag

Let's hedge this with all the usual qualifiers. Kerry could pull it out. The spread's within the margin of error. Respondents to polls are lying out of fear of John Ashcroft.

He can't remember one mistake.
He'll stay on course till Hades freezes.
How can he be so certain still?
Because he's got the word from Jesus.

Articles

Click here for a PDF version of this article.

George W. Bush and I have one thing in common: Our father's friends did us favors--and came to regret it.

Nader backers support Kerry more than Bush, Nation Institute poll shows.

Survey finds risk of swaying election to Bush major concern of Nader
backers

As neither candidate seems to be aware, healthcare is increasingly available only to those who can pay.

The Bush era has seen an explosion of sharply political creativity.

The election season is always hellish for people who fancy that they live by political principles, because at such a time "politics" becomes, even more than usually, a matter of show business and

George W. Bush said Saddam Hussein's brutal regime had chemical and biological weapons and a revived nuclear weapons program. It did not.

Not being "middle class," the poor have been invisible in this campaign.

Philosophy student Julian Johannesen and photographer Cosby Lindquist have been encamped in the neighborhoods of Columbus, Ohio, for more than a year.

Many Arab-American voters loathe Bush, but they have little love for his rival.

Bush's hometown is still behind him, but not with the enthusiasm of 2000.

Why the candidates won't talk about education.

The largest gathering ever of Native Americans in the nation's capital greets the opening of the NMAI.

Books & the Arts

Music

"Mosh" could be one of the most overtly political pop music videos ever produced.

Music

The new Tom Waits album begins, in very Waitsian fashion, with a racket: a squall of percussive noise that sounds like it was recorded in a freight elevator.

Book

When George H.W.

Book

On January 9, 2004, Royal Dutch/Shell, one of the world's largest publicly traded oil companies, shocked the international financial community by announcing that it had overstated its oil and gas