Quantcast

March 14, 2005 | The Nation

In the Magazine

March 14, 2005

Cover:

Browse Selections From Recent Years

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

David Corn makes the case against John Negroponte, Eric Alterman wonders about bloggers and Marc Cooper surveys the LA mayor's race.

Letters

Bush, war and juvenile executions.

$12 KLEENEX, AND MORE...

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY

Editorials

At Pittsburgh's Jefferson Elementary School, which overlooks the dark
gray plumes from two electric power plants, there are so many children
with asthma the school nurse alphabetizes the inhalers

The most important event of the late twentieth century began twenty
years ago this month.

"You have to ask, Who would want this job?" So said a former senior CIA
official referring to the new post of director of national intelligence,
to which George W.

Mourning the loss of "moral values" voters, Democratic leaders have been
softening the party's language on reproductive rights.

Columns

Column Left

Bush's policies have left the leaders of Iran defending a more logical position than that of our own government.

It's hard to know who to root against in the
bloggers vs. CNN controversy that led to the
resignation of CNN's Eason Jordan, a twenty-three-year veteran of the
network.

My friend L., a magistrate in Britain, is appalled by American-style
sentencing, which has taken hold there recently.

The man who's just been put in charge
Of knowing all will now assure us
That he knew nothing--nada, zip--
When he was stationed in Honduras.

Articles

Massive resources are at stake in the debate roiling the AFL-CIO's Las Vegas summit.

Questions the Senate should address to any Supreme Court nominee.

Do progressives and Democrats have a future in the South?

A talk with hip-hop historian Jeff Chang.

A report from the antiwar movement's St. Louis summit.

Antichoice activists cross another line.

The Los Angeles mayoral race raises difficult questions for progressives.

John Kenneth Galbraith was famous long ago as America's most widely read
economist, until his expansive understanding of economic liberalism was
pushed aside by political events and conservativ

An adviser who told Kennedy the truth.

Books & the Arts

Book

Isaac Deutscher stands out among the early intellectual mentors of the
New Left as the only one who expounded classical Marxism. On a mid-1960s
"must read" authors list that included C.

Book

Yiddish, a national language that never had a nation-state, may no
longer have millions of speakers, but it remains contested territory
nonetheless.

Music

Fifty years ago, a young Polish journalist named Leopold Tyrmand lost
his job at the country's last surviving independent publication, the
Catholic weekly Tygodnik Powszechny, which was