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January 7, 2002 | The Nation

In the Magazine

January 7, 2002

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Mark Crispin Miller details the media cartel and its cultural effects, John Nichols and Robert McChesney call for a new national media reform movement, Jeffrey Chester explains why the public policy battles being waged to rein in the "old media" are important to the future of the "new media," Lauren Sandler looks at where Ms. is heading and Salih Booker examines the other world war.

Letters

Readers write in to share their favorite alternative media outlets.

Editorials

The war on terror is threatening to overshadow a far more deadly threat—the AIDS epidemic.

Media consolidation is creeping in slowly while the public’s attention is elsewhere—is it too late to fight back?

Republican majority leader Dick Armey announced that he will retire from Congress, and Democrats are hoping that Tom DeLay will replace him.

 

As the Taliban retreat in Afghanistan, the Bush administration has ample opportunity to expand its far-reaching ‘war on terror.’

The Bush administration's abandonment of the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty was a win for Rumsfeld's Defense Department—but it could be an obstacle for the State Department.

 

What's next for Ms. magazine now that it's hit the ripe age of 30 and is now heading west?

For three months now, I've been closely following the coverage of September 11 and its aftermath; how well have the media done?

Columns

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Enron's Ken Lay is no stranger to not only the Bush family, but the Bush administration. Finally, reporters are starting to take notice and ask questions.

In these heated times, what does the word 'fundamentalist' mean? Well, it all depends on whom you ask.

Stop the Presses

The New Republic strains credibility with its 'Idiocy Watch'—it might want to keep itself in its sights.

With developments in the Mumia Abu-Jamal case and Pacifica's re-emergence, the left has a couple of victories under its belt; the Enron scandal develops further.

Articles

Once roundly condemned for his use of using military courts for civilian crimes, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is now in good company now that the US and the UK have adopted similar measures.

John Stossel has high Q-ratings, so he doesn't have to worry about the rules.

Organic farming critic Dennis Avery is supported by generous contributions from several chemical companies, all of whom profit from the sale of products prohibited in organic production.

To keep the press free, Ben Franklin made sure that periodicals once got preferential treatment from the USPS. It's time to revisit that idea again.

Media policy need to change in the digital age—but how?

Cultural critics and producers sound off on Big Media.

Getting serious about media reform: at a standstill now, the media reform movement's time has come.

Synergy—it's all well and good. But media consolidation's dark side often raises its head.

The rise of the media cartel has been a long time coming. The cultural effects are not new in kind, but the problem has become considerably larger.

Books & the Arts

Art

Norman Rockwell's ouevre is deceptively simple—the self-proclaimed 'illustrator' had more depth than he's credited for.

Film

Director Wes Anderson's 'The Royal Tenenbaums' is full of bittersweet whimsy.

Book

Immigrants and traffickers are the subjects of a certain style of Mexican music.