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Liza Featherstone

Contributing Editor

Liza Featherstone is a journalist based in New York City. Her work on student and youth activism has been published in The Nation, Lingua Franca, the San Francisco Bay Guardian, Left Business Observer, Dissent, The Sydney Morning Herald and Columbia Journalism Review. Featherstone has also written for the New York Times, the Washington Post, Newsday, In These Times, Ms., Salon, Nerve, US, Nylon and Rolling Stone. She is the co-author of Students Against Sweatshops: The Making of a Movement (Verso, 2002) and author of Selling Women Short: The Landmark Battle for Worker's Rights at Wal-Mart (Basic, 2004).


  • Corporations October 17, 2012

    Walmart Workers Walk Out

    In the latest action against the union-busting low-wage retailer, labor organizers may have finally found a strategy that works.

    Liza Featherstone

  • May 4, 2012

    ¿Está Walmart Perdiendo el Apoyo Bipartidista?

    Ha llegado el momento en que demócratas y progresistas conscientes sigan el ejemplo de Nueva York y tomen distancia de este oscuro seductor.

    Liza Featherstone

  • Economy May 2, 2012

    Is Walmart Losing Its Bipartisan Luster?

    In the wake of the Mexican bribery scandal, liberals who had been wooed by the giant retailer are having second thoughts.

    Liza Featherstone

  • December 19, 2011

    Occupy Education

    The Occupy movement takes on neoliberal education reform and the Bloomberg Department of Education.

    Liza Featherstone

  • Activism June 21, 2011

    ‘Dukes v. Wal-Mart’ and the Limits of Legal Change

    The Supreme Court ruling is a victory for mega-corporations everywhere and a sign that justice for women and workers can't be won in the courts alone.

    Liza Featherstone

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  • Corporations March 30, 2011

    Justice for Betty Dukes and the Women of Wal-Mart?

    If corporate America and right-wing libertarians get their way, thousands of female Wal-Mart employees will never get the substance of their case heard in court.

    Liza Featherstone

  • Activism June 10, 2009

    Out of Reach

    As the cost of college hits the stratosphere, students are organizing to bring it down to earth.

    Liza Featherstone

  • Economy January 28, 2009

    Help Wanted for Green Jobs

    It's inspiring to have a president who talks the talk on green-collar jobs. But we need megawatts, not just megawords.

    Liza Featherstone

  • July 9, 2007

    Starbucks On Trial

    Today Starbucks went on trial in Manhattan, and I had the privilege of attending several hours of the proceedings today. On the way downtown, I noticed that a young woman on the subway seemed to be using a brown paper Starbucks bag as a purse. And it did make a pretty nice handbag! Starbucks's professions of concern for "corporate responsibility" are much like that: attractive packaging. In the trial that began today, the nation's leading purveyor of coffee-flavored milk drinks stands accused by the National Labor Relations Board of thirty violations of employee rights, especially firing workers for union organizing. Starbucks had seven lawyers present. The two fired workers in question-- Daniel Gross and Joe Agins, Jr., both IWW members -- were present. Gross wore a suit and looked sharp, as any activist appearing before a judge probably should. (Agins went for a less formal look -- a sleeveless muscle t-shirt.) Today both sides waded through the details of discovery; that is to say, the NLRB lawyers asked for documents from Starbucks, and the company's legal team whined about how "burdensome" it would be to get so many documents, because, since the turnover rate is so high, many of the relevant personnel files are now in storage. It is very difficult to get the files out once they go in, Stacy Eisenstein, one of Starbucks lead outside counsel, argued with a straight face. More incredibly, before the hearing had officially begun, she disputed the NLRB's contention that there was a union campaign going on when Gross and Agin were fired. If that is a major cornerstone of Starbucks's defense, the company could be in trouble, because the judge -- who seemed very fair-minded and interested in reaching reasonable compromises -- did not buy it, and allowed discovery based on the assumption that the date of the union campaign was relevant. (Also, there is ample public record of the campaign, including media coverage.) It will be interesting to see what happens. I can't be there for much of the rest of the trial, unfortunately, so I really hope other journalists and bloggers will go check it out. They are taking tomorrow off, and back in session Wednesday.

    Liza Featherstone

  • July 2, 2007

    Party for the Planet

    This Saturday, people around the world will attend more than 5,000 parties in honor of a much idolized, much abused celeb-of-the-moment. No, it's not Princess Di. These parties aim to help the planet, by committing the guests to work against climate change. It's the first time the political house party has ever been used globally, according to the organizers, and it's reached at least 114 countries so far, including Bosnia, Sierra Leone and the Philippines. (Note the rather severe troubles facing people in those countries. So, those of you thinking of not bothering because you have your own problems to deal with? You might want to think again.) Organized by Avaaz (which I've written about in this space before) and MoveOn, the house parties will coincide with the Live Earth concert. Big fat global concert events don't always accomplish much. (Remember Live Aid? Or worse, the dreadful "Feed the World" theme song? Block that 80s flashback!) But the organizers of these house parties believe Live Earth can be different, and they're aiming to, according to Ricken Patel, executive director of Avaaz, "turn the moment into a movement." Party guests will pledge not only to change consumption habits but more importantly, to engage in political action on this issue. They'll agree to pressure their governments to sign on to a global climate treaty agreeing to a 90% reduction in emissions over the next generation. What are you doing Saturday night?

    Liza Featherstone