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Bryce Covert | The Nation

Bryce Covert

Author Bios

Bryce Covert

Bryce Covert

Bryce Covert is the Economic Policy Editor for ThinkProgress and a blogger at TheNation.com.

Articles

News and Features

If Republicans are playing hardball, Democrats should too.

Ryan wouldn’t just slash Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. He would fundamentally alter how those programs work.

Few new mothers get paid maternity leave. Those who take unpaid leave often go deep into debt to make ends meet.

Twelve red states account for 70 percent of all state and local public sector jobs lost since 2010.

Women dominate growing sectors like retail and home healthcare—but the jobs there are grueling and the wages are low.

Topeka, Kansas, decriminalized domestic violence to save money. It’s not the only city to cut services to survivors of abuse, just as the need escalates.

As domestic workers win state-level struggles for workplace protections, their employers—many of them middle-class families—get stuck with the bill, while the government gets off scot-free.

Credit card companies have targeted women for some of their worst deals. But as consumer advocates start policing the industry, some women risk seeing access to credit dry up.

Traditionally female-heavy industries—once thought to be recession-proof—are being hit hard by the “tough choices” made by governors facing depleted state coffers.

Blogs

Mothers like Shanesha Taylor and Debra Harrell are caught in a childcare Catch-22 that we made for them.
A new study finds board quotas don’t improve conditions for the average working woman, but they do the job of giving women more...
Professional dress was created with the male worker in mind, and the unclear guidelines facing women shows we haven’t fully accepted...
Girls may outperform boys in school, but the workplace is still stacked against them.
Women put in long hours inside and outside the home, making a more prosperous economy, and we reward them with crappy public policy.
There’s no biological explanation for why women end up doing more housework, so it must stem from societal forces.
There’s no objective explanation for why black women make less than white women.
Ta-Nehisi Coates's detractors are too quick to declare him overly pessimistic about how white supremacy still shapes our society.