Wednesday’s Frontline on PBS Investigates Post-Katrina Police Shootings

Wednesday’s Frontline on PBS Investigates Post-Katrina Police Shootings

Wednesday’s Frontline on PBS Investigates Post-Katrina Police Shootings

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Five years ago next week, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the body of Henry Glover was found burned to death in a charred sedan overlooking the Mississippi River in New Orleans. The case was mysterious from the start, but it wasn’t until A.C. Thompson’s 2009 article for The Nation, "Body of Evidence," that a real investigation began. Under pressure from The Nation, from advocacy groups like ColorofChange.org and from extensive, ground-breaking collaborative reporting by investigative-journalism non-profit Pro Publica & the New Orleans Times-Picayune, a formal investigation was launched. Earlier this year an indictment was handed down in the case. 

On Wednesday night PBS’s FRONTLINE profiles the Glover case—along with five other stories about post-Katrina police shootings—in the hour-long documentary "Law & Disorder." A collaborative effort between FRONTLINE, Pro Publica and the Times-Picayune, "Law & Disorder" expanded the Glover investigation into a multi-year inquiry into the NOPD and post-Katrina violence. You can watch a preview here, and check the FRONTLINE website for air-times and the full episode. The show premieres Wednesday night at 9PM. 

You can watch an interview with A.C. Thompson, now a staff reporter with Pro Publica, here.

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