Impossible to Ignore Wikileaks Tape

Impossible to Ignore Wikileaks Tape

Martin Luther King’s words in 1967 are still relevant to today’s war, as the Wikileaks tape shows.

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"Well, it’s their fault bringing their kids to a battle."

Those words, spoken by a faceless soldier, echo from a classified US military video released by the site Wikileaks.org. The release comes on the heels of the revelation of a cover-up in Afghanistan—and the anniversary of the death of Dr. Martin Luther King, as well as the anniversary of his “Beyond Vietnam” speech.

King spoke to the Clergy and Laity Concerned about Vietnam, saying “It should be incandescently clear that no one who has any concern for the integrity and life of America today can ignore the present war. If America’s soul becomes totally poisoned, part of the autopsy must read Vietnam."

Hearing allegations that special forces troops in Afghanistan may have dug the bullets out of their pregnant victims bodies to hide evidence, hearing airmen on the Wikileaks tape begging “Come on, let us shoot!” and hearing the editor of Wikileaks say that the shooters talked in the way that people do when they’re playing video games–it reminded me of King’s words.

He told the truth about war: that it is horrible, that it does poison your soul. Dr. King also said, in a different speech, that there is such a thing as being too late when it comes to speaking up against your goverment doing wrong.

The F Word is a regular commentary by Laura Flanders, the host of GRITtv which broadcasts weekdays on satellite TV (Dish Network Ch. 9415 Free Speech TV) on cable, and online at GRITtv.org and TheNation.com. Support us by signing up for our podcast, and follow GRITtv or GRITlaura on Twitter.com.

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