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July 21, 2003 | The Nation

In the Magazine

July 21, 2003

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The Nation salutes American heroes, David Cole lauds Justice Lewis Powell and Bruce McCall finds Saddam.

Letters


DIRTY BOMBS AND CHERNOBYL

Washington, DC


LET'S HEAR IT FOR ATCA!

Washington, DC

Editorials

Since 1968 the Democrats have been shut out, more or less, as majority
party. But with a small bump in left-of-center turnout, they'd be
running the country.

Top intelligence experts now believe beret-fancying Iraqi dictator
Saddam Hussein died of complications from swallowing his mustache during
a US missile attack on his Baghdad bunker in March, b


Post-9/11 detainees at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn
were held in lockdown twenty-three hours a day (an

"Diary of a Mad Law Professor" columnist Patricia J. Williams is on
leave to work on a book. Her column will resume in September.

More people voted in the wwww.MoveOn.org PAC online presidential primary than
are expected to participate in next January's Democratic caucuses in
Iowa and t

"Intelligence is an art, not a science," says Deputy Defense Secretary
Wolfowitz. Secretary of State Powell observes, "There are always debates
about intelligence subjects.

The Supreme Court's sweeping June 26 ruling in Lawrence v. Texas
came almost seventeen years to the day after one of the darkest moments
in the history of the gay movement.

Nation readers should be excused for wondering whether they were
in some sort of time warp as the Supreme Court closed its term with a
slew of decisions that recalled the halcyon days of

Columns

scheer

Does the President not read? Does his national security staff, led by Condoleezza Rice, keep him in the dark about the most pressing issues of the day?

Ask Dr. Marc

Dr. Marc Siegel was recently named the "Breast Friend of the Month" by the Breast Cancer Action Network. Click here to read more.

scheer

A former US ambassador says Cheney and others knew the alleged Iraq uranium purchase was baseless long before Bush used it in his State of the Union speech

Canadians can't quite believe it. Suddenly, we're interesting.

Snoozing guards at Los Alamos, missing vials of plutonium oxide... Yes,
the headlines in late June were announcing "security lapses" again at
national labs and nuclear weapons plants.

So what if it's private, in their hacienda?
It's sodomy still, and enough to offend a
Respectable man, and we must never lend a
Leg up to that vile homosexual agenda!

Articles

Bush's new appointee Karen Tandy has a professional history deserving serious Congressional scrutiny.

The hard lessons of Guantánamo have yet to be learned, while many of the old mistakes are being repeated.

Rupert Murdoch will soon become an even more powerful presence in the US.

Most of what we know about the life of Miles Davis is either anecdotal
or a matter of official record, and thus not absolutely reliable; but by
all accounts, most pertinently his own, Miles Dav

When Paul Wellstone perished in a plane crash along with his wife, his
daughter and three members of his staff in October 2002, the horror of
his death nearly overshadowed the meaning of his li

Late one night in October 1961, I flew from Atlanta to Jackson,
Mississippi, with Bob Moses.

In the final days of Rudy Giuliani's term as mayor of New York, three
months after the heroism of 9/11, he quietly approved a politically
wired project to build twenty-five multimillion-dollar

When Bob Dylan took the stage at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival, all
leather and Ray-Bans and Beatle boots, and declared emphatically and
(heaven forbid) electrically that he wasn't "gonna work

Benjamin Elijah Mays--devout Christian minister, uncompromising advocate
for justice, career educator and longtime president of Morehouse College
in Atlanta--was called the "Schoolmaster of the

"No Gods, No Masters," the rallying cry of the Industrial Workers of the
World, was her personal and political manifesto.

"I've been described as a tough noisy woman--a prizefighter--a
man-hater...a Jewish mother with more complaints than Portnoy.

Sidney Hook, the Marxist philosopher-turned-neoconservative who once
mistakenly listed I.F.

In 1848, 29-year-old Walt Whitman was for three months a reporter for
the Daily Crescent in New Orleans, writing fluff pieces about
local color and charm as seen through Yankee eyes.

"This road was as doomed as the Palestinian Authority itself."

Books & the Arts

Film

This Independence Day, the symbolic struggle being waged on thousands of
screens across the Empire pits Reese Witherspoon against Arnold
Schwarzenegger, gooey-sweet girl against impassive (but

Book

Although the laboriously negotiated and long-delayed Middle East "road map" received a diplomatic boost by the recent intervention of George W. Bush, the plan is replete with the same structural flaws that doomed the Oslo Accords.

Book

Much of the talk in Europe these days--in newspaper offices, at dinner
parties, in foreign ministries--is about how the United States and
Britain were conned into going to war against Iraq, or