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January 12, 2004 | The Nation

In the Magazine

January 12, 2004

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2004

Arthur Miller visits with Fidel Castro, David Cole cautions against a war on our rights and Stuart Klawans surveys the year's best films.

Letters


"Hatchet job" was the term most often used by readers to describe Matt Taibbi's "Clark's True Colors" [Dec. 15].

Editorials

My patient John Elias, with a fixed income from Social Security and a small pension, is a perfect candidate for prescription drug coverage.

A joyless holiday season faces 70,000 unionized Southern and Central California supermarket workers who have been on strike or locked out since October 11.

Ralph Nader has finally figured out how to unite Democrats and Greens.

Many people believed at the time that the trauma of 9/11 would change the world. My feeling was that our American response would be far more crucial.

"Even in times of national emergency--indeed, particularly in such times--it is the obligation of the Judicial Branch to ensure the preservation of our constitutional values and to prevent the E

Libya's agreement to give up its weapons of mass destruction and open itself up to inspection by the International Atomic Energy Agency is a welcome development.

Petulance is seldom considered a prime presidential attribute. George W. Bush's smirk notwithstanding, Americans prefer adults as Presidents.

Columns

scheer

When televangelist gloated about a Bush 'blowout' delivered by God, perhaps it was a heaven-sent warning.

scheer

New documents detail how Rumsfeld and Reagan let Iraq know it was just fine to keep using chemical weapons against Iran and the Kurds.

Stop the Presses

Saddam Hussein may be out of his spider hole, but
Washington's real enemy is still at large.

Music

There was plenty of
gloomy news for women in 2003. American women make just under 80
cents on the male dollar for full-time, year-round work.

A right to counsel and a right to trial?
John Ashcroft wonders: How do you suppose
We'll save our freedoms and our way of life
If we start granting everybody those?

Articles

Until there is a legitimate government in Iraq, it's unclear whether any new oil deals will stand.

At the heart of the matter is a $6 billion factory built in Nigeria by Hallibuton.

Reporters say harassment and intimidation by American soldiers is growing.

It's a humid Mediterranean morning in late October.

Teen girls are the target market for a new wave of stripper-inspired merchandise.

Labor studies programs are under attack by a well-financed right-wing campaign.

Brilliant, spirited, but he's stayed too long.

Books & the Arts

Book

This is a book that should be on every activist's bed table, like Gideon bibles in hotels.

Book

The
likeness of Nathaniel Hawthorne hanging in the AmLit museum resembles
the shadowy, fading portrait of a distinguished ancestor.

Poetry

Many rhetorical bombshells were lobbed by British and
American poets during the political turmoil of the 1930s, but few
detonated as loudly as this cluster of words: "Today the deliberate
i

Book

One notable casualty of the
diplomatic tug-of-war between France and the United States over the
American-led invasion and occupation of Iraq has been verbal
restraint.

Film

An indispensable work of art, especially at
this moment in our history, Errol Morris's new documentary declares
its theme before you even step into the theater. The Fog of
War
, says