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August 21, 2000 | The Nation

In the Magazine

August 21, 2000

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Editorials

Democrats gather in Los Angeles facing large questions not just about
their success in November but also about the direction of their party.
George W.

Less than a hour after George Bush concluded his party's
have-a-nice-election convention with a vapid but beyond-the-expectations
acceptance speech, a source deep within the Gore camp called me

Paul Newman refers all letters relative to this article to Toys "R"
Us.


CENTERING GORE
"They chose to close
ranks instead of opening up dialogue," California State Senator Tom
Hayden said after the Democratic Platform Comm

When Dubya picked Dick Cheney as his running mate, the little screen was
awash in flatulent flatteries from the chattering classes: "a grown-up,"
"presidential," "all steak and no sizzle" were

Columns

Stop the Presses

A part of me recoils at the thought of adding even a syllable to the
ocean of pontifical sludge emanating from the Republican confab in
Philadelphia, so mind-numbingly inane and diligently dece

Articles

Paying off the national debt used to be an obsession of Calvinist
fundamentalists on the fringes of the Republican Party, but this year it
is the boldest banner held aloft by the Democratic Par

When members of the LA janitors' union decided to go on strike this past
April, their success was far from guaranteed.

In this gilded-age election, big money is speaking louder than ever. And
voters and large contributors to both parties agree that when money
talks, politicians listen.

The draft Democratic Party platform doesn't speak forcefully to the
concerns of ordinary people.

On the eve of the Democratic convention, the challenge to Democrats is
to recognize the limits of the current economic boom and act boldly to
assist those left behind.

Running from bank- and hotel-lined Wilshire Boulevard, up the glittering gulch of Rodeo Drive, past the slinky curves of Sunset and snaking up leafy Coldwater and Benedict canyons to the legend

Ralph Nader, America's indomitable public citizen, is the one great man
in this presidential election.

It must be some playful new postmodernist form of politics: First you
spend years ranting about the plutocracy that has supplanted American
democracy and is rapidly devouring the planet.