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David Cole | The Nation

David Cole

Author Bios

David Cole

David Cole

Legal Affairs Correspondent

David Cole (@DavidColeGtown), The Nation's legal affairs correspondent, is the author, most recently, of The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (New Press).

Articles

News and Features

In ruling that police may not search cellphones without a warrant, the Court brought the Fourth Amendment into the twenty-first century.

That was when the Bureau of Investigation—the forerunner of today’s FBI—first opened a file on the magazine.

The president has made a step toward better oversight, but his proposals leave the agency’s system of dragnet surveillance mostly intact.

Updating the Fourth Amendment has been done before, to address the invention of cars, phones and GPS. It’s time to do it again.

Americans are justifiably upset about the NSA’s sweeping domestic surveillance. But we should be just as concerned about spying on foreigners.

The uproar over government searches of media phone records should not obscure the deeper problem—the law’s failure to protect the privacy of all of us in the digital age.

That’s the unanimous conclusion of a nonpartisan task force. It should teach us not to overreact to the Boston bombings.

After Boston, we must proceed with caution—and respect the rule of law.

The White House evidently believes it can kill us in secret and never own up to the fact.

Blogs

Affirmative action survives, for now, but the Court erects new hurdles for employment discrimination suits.
In a 6-2 decision, the Court prohibited the government from requiring organizations to espouse specific ideas in order to receive funding.
Somewhere along the way, we lost our bearings on the balance between privacy and security.
A stunning report by The Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald reveals that the NSA has been tracking every call by Verizon business customers....
President Obama may not call the individual mandate a “tax”—but John Roberts does.
The Court gave the Obama administration near-total victory, striking down key parts of Arizona’s immigration law.
Today's decisions about sex, drugs, and union speech may offer clues about next week's decision on healthcare.
What’s next for the Defense of Marriage Act?