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Arizona Burning > Letters

Where is the moral outcry when The Nation and the New York Times misrepresent the new law?

Where is the moral outcry when The Nation and the New York Times misrepresent the new law? In throwing fact-checking out the window, they've joined the ranks of Hannity and Limbaugh.

Where is the moral outcry when the drug smugglers rip each other off at gunpoint, murder each other, and kidnap each others' children and hold them for ransom? Or when illegals rob new illegals in the desert, or hold them hostage for ransom in the suburbs of Phoenix and Tucson? Get slammed in a traffic accident? Guess what? The driver is an unlicensed and uninsured illegal, and he is definitely going to run--driving up the cost of your insurance.

Where is the moral outcry when an old man takes pity on illegals crossing his property, offers them water and a hot meal--and while cooking the meal, is mugged, bound, robbed and has his truck stolen?

Where is the moral outcry when a borderland rancher is shot to death on his own property by illegals?

Where is the moral outcry when Arizona's legal taxpayers must shell out nearly $250,000 a year housing--and providing food, shelter, and medical and dental care for--illegals convicted of felonies in our state?

Get your facts straight, people. And if you want more than a knee-jerk response to the new law, ask those who have migrated here legally, and are as fed up with the illegals who abuse our hospitality as the rest of us.

Michael D. Kaliher

Bonita, AZ

Apr 30 2010 - 7:22pm

It seems to have occurred to no one in the press that the demonstrations at Arizona's capitol were actually quite small, considering the large Hispanic population in this state.

It seems to have occurred to no one in the press that the demonstrations at Arizona's capitol were actually quite small, considering the large Hispanic population in this state. That's because many Latinos are fed up with the lack of enforcement when it comes to illegal immigration.

It is one thing to to cross the border, but yet another to harm someone who has never done anything to you. Immigration activists and sanctuary cities have ignored and even condoned respect for private property rights, unfair competition and ID theft. Does it surprise you at The Nation that illegals from Mexico don't pick names like vanden Heuvel to steal? The argument that illegals only do kitchen work or pick crops is a myth propagated by elitists who would squeal loudly if they had to compete against undocumented workers.

Yes, we need immigration reform. However, framing that reform from the superficial perspective of racism will not solve the problem.

Robert Stephens

Flagstaff, AZ

Apr 30 2010 - 8:09am

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It is a matter of the frustration and desperation felt, and an ugly response by Arizona to the people's legitimate needs. The federal authorities need to correct the problems and control the boder. I, myself, favor quick, easy, cheap regularization, but you cannot pretend that the problem is not a legitimate concern. The Arizona law should pass constitutional muster, since it is only a backup on law that is already a federal crime, nothing new.

John D. Froelich

Upper Darby, PA

Apr 29 2010 - 12:26pm

Web Letter

I find this new law appalling on so many levels, more than I am able to express.

I am seeing a terrible trend in this country. Groups are being selected--first it was Muslims and now (again) Hispanics (as has happened in the past)--as being somehow "other," somehow not "acceptable" in America--not American, not fully human.

As a former historian, I know that there has always been racism in America. Of that I have no illusions. I had hoped with Obama's election America could be turning an important corner. But, alas, this is not happening. In fact, the opposite seems to be happening. Racism has now been given credence by the law passed in Arizona.

Already other states, including my own state, is voicing interest in enacting legislation similar to Arizona's law.

What is next for America? People being forced to wear a symbol on their clothing to indicate their ethnicity and their eligibility to be in this country?

I strongly urge all Americans to take a stand against this law. I am asking everyone I know to boycott Arizona and its businesses until this law is repealed and to write their elected officials to let them know this law is intolerable.

Barbara Lockwood

Temple, TX

Apr 29 2010 - 12:24pm