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Books and Ideas

Books and Ideas news and analysis from The Nation

  • May 27, 1999

    Leisurely Pleasure

    This brief essay is taken from the latest book by Amos Oz, The Story Begins: Essays on Literature (Harcourt Brace).

    Amos Oz

  • May 13, 1999

    Borges in Another M├ętier

    With Pablo Neruda and Alejo Carpentier, Jorge Luis Borges set in motion the wave of astonishing writing that has given Latin American literature its high place in our time.

    Jay Parini

  • May 13, 1999

    On the Virtual Picket Line

    The unfortunate flaw in From the Telegraph to the Internet is its title, which suggests a highly specialized account of an industry when in fact it is a deeply moving narrative of a commi

    Marcus G. Raskin

  • May 13, 1999

    Labor’s Foundations

    Deep in the pages of the biweekly Chronicle of Philanthropy lies the "New Grants" section.

    Colman McCarthy

  • May 6, 1999

    Lovestone’s Thin Red Line

    Jay Lovestone is not only one of the oddest characters in the history of the American left but easily its most slippery.

    Paul Buhle

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  • May 6, 1999

    The Spies Who Loved Us?

    I still kick myself for not having saved the short story I wrote for composition class in seventh grade in which I described how the Russians took over my small suburban community.

    Ellen Schrecker

  • April 29, 1999

    Fading Czech Velvet

    As I'm driven to the home of Ivan Klima, one of the Czech Republic's most internationally respected writers, the hand of fate slips in beside me in the taxi.

    Mark Schapiro

  • April 21, 1999

    Rushdie as Orpheus, on Guitar

    From the Satanic Versifier, more love and more death, with a song in his heart.

    John Leonard

  • April 15, 1999

    France’s Philosophe Impolitique

    Recent French philosophy has been most passionately loved and hated for its militant radicalism.

    Richard Shusterman

  • April 15, 1999

    Solzhenitsyn’s History Lesson

    Knowledge of Khrushchev's reaction cited above is personal; he was the author's grandfather.

    Nina Khrushcheva

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