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May 26, 2003 | The Nation

In the Magazine

May 26, 2003

Cover:

Browse Selections From Recent Years

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2006

2005

2004

E. L. Doctorow explains why we are all infidels, Bob Moser profiles Samaritians in the desert and Rebecca Vesely charts a rethinking in Silicon Valley.

Letters

Montpelier, VT


CAN WE TALK? GUESS NOT

Los Angeles

Editorials

GUNS-AND-BUTTER ISSUES

In this space last week, I commented that the choice for the United
States in North Korea was probably between a catastrophic war and
permitting North Korea to keep its nuclear program and its

Congratulations to Katha Pollitt, winner of the National Magazine Award
in the Columns and Commentary category. Katha also won the 1992 award in
Essays & Criticism.

Over the past few months, yet another epidemic has come to trouble our
unhappy world. Shortly after SARS was identified, the entire globe was
put on notice.

Victor Navasky's Naming Names (Hill & Wang) was
recently reissued in paperback with a new afterword.

Lately, presidential contender Howard Dean has been likening himself to
the late Senator Paul Wellstone.

The best names in Wall Street, who besmirched themselves with
double-dealing stock-market scandals, were finally "punished" recently,
and the miscreants could not contain their glee.

Columns

scheer

It turns out the threat is not from Iraq but from us.

In most of the world, it's the sign for peace, but here in Argentina it
means war.

Recently Congress released transcripts of secret testimony of witnesses
summoned before Senator Joseph McCarthy's infamous subcommittee in
hearings that impugned the patriotism of everyone from

Come June 4, Ed Rosenthal will be back in US District Court in San
Francisco, to hear what sentence Judge Charles Breyer has decided to
impose.

Bill Bennett told a grateful nation,
"Be moral. Just resist temptation."
By windbag airing of this thesis,
Bill Bennett got as rich as Croesus.

Articles

The new UN resolution doesn't even try to bring the Iraqi occupation into line with international law.

US troops transformed the ancient site of Ur into a base, even digging trenches into the ground.

Several staggered rows of grayish papier-mâum;ché headstones have sprouted on the grassy quad of Santa Monica College--the crown jewel of Southern California's once envied and now bat

See also Tim Shorrock's March 2002 story for The Nation
on the Carlyle Group.

As unemployment soars, many workers are rethinking their libertarian views.

In the name of fighting terrorism, the Army has established a domestic command.

Defying US policy, they save the lives of illegal migrants, a cup of water at a time.

Fundamentalists are offended when there is no officially sanctioned path to salvation.

Books & the Arts

Press

The announcement a few weeks ago that Partisan Review was closing
shop after a run of nearly seventy years brought sadness--since
PR at its best was a central site of American cul

Book

In the current national climate, the notion that Washington might learn
from the experience of former Soviet leaders Nikita Khrushchev or
Mikhail Gorbachev would strike most as ludicrous.

It is agonizingly difficult to write about one's hometown as it drowns
in flames and suffocates with smoke.