Quantcast

May 12, 2003 | The Nation

In the Magazine

May 12, 2003

Cover:

Browse Selections From Recent Years

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

Wayne Smith discusses the crackdown in Cuba, Jonathan Schell examines the governors of Baghdad and Gabrielle Menezes writes from Zimbabwe.

Letters


PEOPLE POWER PEOPLE

New Paltz, NY

Editorials

If you'd like to add your name to this statement, e-mail leocasey@aol.com.

In Baghdad this week, one Mohammed Mohsen Zubaidi, an Iraqi businessman
with ties to the Iraqi National Congress, has shown up claiming to be
the city's governor.

The arrest and long-term imprisonment of dozens of dissidents in Cuba
and the rapid execution of three men who had attempted to hijack a boat
were deplorable.

On March 22, a few hundred peaceful antiwar protesters in Seattle who
had gathered around the Federal Building suddenly found themselves being
swept down streets by officers in riot gear and th

Emboldened by the "success" of its preventive war in Iraq, the Bush
Administration appears to be expanding its preventive law-enforcement
strategy at home.

On the second day of the invasion of Iraq, US commandos seized two Iraqi
offshore oil terminals in the Persian Gulf, capturing their defenders
without a fight.

Even before US troops arrived in Baghdad, looting broke out--in
Washington.

Columns

scheer

Forget truth. That is the message from our government and its apologists in the media who insist that the Iraq invasion is a great success story even though it was based on a lie.

Over dinner recently, a friend of mine mused that "at least it's not as
bad as the McCarthy era." Perhaps not.

As a million Shiite pilgrims streamed toward Karbala shouting, "No to
America, no to Saddam, no to tyranny, no to Israel!" can't you just
imagine the plash of complacent I Told Him So's from th

(A preventive-war anthem sung to the tune of "Trees," by Joyce
Kilmer, with piano accompaniment)

Articles

By focusing only on the worst-case scenarios regarding the spread
of SARS, the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease
Control are trying to control the populace through fear.

On April 11th--the day of the most widespread and uncontrolled looting in Iraq--Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld produced one of the more sour notes of the nascent postwar period.

When Ayatollah Abdel Majid al-Khoei was stabbed to death earlier this month by a mob in Shiite Islam's holiest mosque, the bloody event was widely described as a blow to the forces of reconciliat

The ravages of drought are evident to anyone traveling through Zimbabwe.
The carcass of a dead donkey lies on the road, while skeletal dogs tear
at its intestines.

It's a great country. Don't let the hucksters and charlatans take it
away.

How 'fighting terrorism' became a bludgeon in Bush's assault on labor.

The right-wing ideologues are dead serious about dismantling
government.

Books & the Arts

Poetry

How much, in just twenty years, Donald Revell has changed! From the
Abandoned Cities
(1983), his debut volume, included a villanelle, a
sestina, rhymed sonnets and meditative terza rima.

Book

Ever since Clark Kent first donned a pair of oversized glasses and,
somewhat improbably, hid his Superman persona from Lois Lane, questions
of identity have been a staple of the comic-book genr

Baghdad has fallen. The city has been taken by the troops who were
bringing it freedom.