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July 12, 2004 | The Nation

In the Magazine

July 12, 2004

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Naomi Klein reports on Iraq occupation spending abuses, Esther Kaplan examines the American Jewish community's divide on Israel-Palestine and Gene Santoro remembers Ray Charles and Robert Quine.

Letters

SPIN ONE FOR THE GIPPER

Seattle

Editorials

Ever since the September 11 commission stated authoritatively what everyone knew already, namely that there is no evidence that Al Qaeda was in business with Saddam Hussein, a debate of a most pe

In 2000, Al Gore beat George W. Bush in the state of New Mexico by a mere 366 votes--a slimmer margin than in Florida. Ralph Nader polled 21,251 votes.

When Ralph Reed was the boyish director of the Christian Coalition, he made opposition to gambling a major plank in his "family values" agenda, calling gambling "a cancer on the American body pol

Africa Action has launched a petition, supported by the Congressional Black Caucus, that calls on Secretary of State Colin Powell to name the genocide in Darfur and to support immediate intervention to stop the killing.

Announcing the winner of the Nation Button Contest!

Readers who'd like to support the workers of Local 556 can send a tax-deductible donation to "Safe Work/Safe Food," c/o Teamsters Local 556, 1750 Portland Avenue, Walla Walla, WA 99362.

The most intriguing story in Washington these days is a subterranean conflict that reporters cannot cover because some of them are involved.

Let's not be naïve. Presidents, like diplomats, at times go forth and lie for their country.

Milton Glaser, a longtime friend of The Nation and the designer behind the "I ♥ NY" campaign, is back with a new idea: He proposes that New Yorkers welcome the GOP in August with a

Columns

scheer

The new, free Iraq may officially be in the hands of a former terrorist.

scheer

Yet even in face of the 9/11 commission's rebuke, the White House keeps dissembling on Al Qaeda links

EMENDATION: Naomi Klein reported in her July 12 "Lookout" column that Aegis CEO Tim Spicer helped put down rebels and stage a military coup in Papua New Guinea. Actually, although his secret employment by the PNG government to put down rebels became a divisive issue within the PNG military and led to a military coup, Spicer played no role in staging the coup. (7/14/04)

By now, it has become something of a media cliché to watch "fringe" protesters jumping up and down from the edges of G-8 conferences held at ever more remote locations.

The commission's report starts anew
Nanny's fairy tales, worthy of Pooh.
For the contrary facts that accrue
Can do nothing to change Cheney's view.

Articles

New anti-condom CDC regs give the lie to Bush's election-year rhetoric.

The Chief Justice wrote a rationale for Nixon's invasion that is being used to justify torture.

"Boys, we are in a bad situation. Yes, very bad."

A federal appeals court rejects FCC rule changes that eased limits on media monopoly.

Seeing the limits of living-wage laws, activists seek a raise for all workers.

A growing grassroots movement has challenged the artificial AIPAC consensus.

During the 2000 election, many activists saw little difference between Democrats and Republicans.

While New York City authorities and anti-GOP organizers square off over the right to rally, cultural activists are taking matters into their own hands.

The Democratic Party is poised to regain the majority.

Books & the Arts

Music

After Ronald Reagan's death, Ray Charles's version of "Amazing Grace," one of Reagan's favorite songs, kept popping up on radio and TV. Why not?

Book

Christianity in this country has become almost synonymous with right-wing fanaticism, conservative politics and--courtesy of Mel Gibson--a brutally sadistic version of religious experience.

Book

In 1965, nearly forty years before the publication of Where I Was From, her most recent and most sustained meditation on her native state of California, the novelist and essayist Joan Didi

Film

Not the judgment of film critics but the passage of time will decide whether Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 can change the world. Change, of course, is the whole purpose.