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William Greider | The Nation

William Greider

Author Bios

William Greider

William Greider

National Affairs Correspondent

William Greider, a prominent political journalist and author, has been a reporter for more than 35 years for newspapers, magazines and television. Over the past two decades, he has persistently challenged mainstream thinking on economics.

For 17 years Greider was the National Affairs Editor at Rolling Stone magazine, where his investigation of the defense establishment began. He is a former assistant managing editor at the Washington Post, where he worked for fifteen years as a national correspondent, editor and columnist. While at the Post, he broke the story of how David Stockman, Ronald Reagan's budget director, grew disillusioned with supply-side economics and the budget deficits that policy caused, which still burden the American economy.

He is the author of the national bestsellers One World, Ready or Not, Secrets of the Temple and Who Will Tell The People. In the award-winning Secrets of the Temple, he offered a critique of the Federal Reserve system. Greider has also served as a correspondent for six Frontline documentaries on PBS, including "Return to Beirut," which won an Emmy in 1985.

Greider's most recent book is The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to A Moral Economy. In it, he untangles the systemic mysteries of American capitalism, details its destructive collisions with society and demonstrates how people can achieve decisive influence to reform the system's structure and operating values.

Raised in Wyoming, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati, he graduated from Princeton University in 1958. He currently lives in Washington, DC.

Articles

News and Features

German corporations are far more respectful of worker rights—and may have more influence on future US developments than our politicians realize.

This 100-year-old antique is undemocratic, too close to elite banking interests and often blind to the economic conditions that affect most Americans.

Rep. Jim McDermott of Washington is optimistic that it will come—if we give states the tools to adopt it at their own pace.

He gave me the language and the nerve to write seriously about the idea of democracy.

Maybe it’s not too big to face criminal charges after all.

But there are other openings on the board. Here’s a list of smart, independent-minded candidates who can fill them.

His withdrawal from consideration as Fed chair could mark a watershed for the left wing of the Democratic Party.

His appointment as next chair of the Federal Reserve would be a clear sign that narrow financial interests are still in charge of the Democratic Party.

The reform-minded senator talks tough, and she knows where the bodies are buried.

Everyone's favorite Nobel-winning Keynesian is no longer gravely deluded on the global economy. How much can we trust him now? 

Blogs

Washington’s armchair generals are salivating at the world’s current turmoil, seeing a chance to rehabilitate themselves.
As deceptive right-wing attacks on Social Security continue, some Democrats have gone on the offensive—seeking to expand rather than...
Does the Democratic party’s soul lie with Hilliary Clinton, moderation and Wall Street—or somewhere else?
In case after case, the Court is expanding the power of corporations and the very wealthy while making it harder for ordinary citizens to...
Is it any wonder GOP hawks want to send $100 million in direct military aid to Ukraine—and green light arms sales?
Edward Snowden is portrayed as a traitor, a fugitive criminal and maybe even a Russian spy, but when he showed up in Washington he was...
The Justice’s dissent in the Michigan college admissions case identified an enduring element of white supremacy clinging to our...
The president should be proposing new rules for importers who manufacture their products overseas, but don’t hold your breath.