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William Greider | The Nation

William Greider

Author Bios

William Greider

William Greider

National Affairs Correspondent

William Greider, a prominent political journalist and author, has been a reporter for more than 35 years for newspapers, magazines and television. Over the past two decades, he has persistently challenged mainstream thinking on economics.

For 17 years Greider was the National Affairs Editor at Rolling Stone magazine, where his investigation of the defense establishment began. He is a former assistant managing editor at the Washington Post, where he worked for fifteen years as a national correspondent, editor and columnist. While at the Post, he broke the story of how David Stockman, Ronald Reagan's budget director, grew disillusioned with supply-side economics and the budget deficits that policy caused, which still burden the American economy.

He is the author of the national bestsellers One World, Ready or Not, Secrets of the Temple and Who Will Tell The People. In the award-winning Secrets of the Temple, he offered a critique of the Federal Reserve system. Greider has also served as a correspondent for six Frontline documentaries on PBS, including "Return to Beirut," which won an Emmy in 1985.

Greider's most recent book is The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to A Moral Economy. In it, he untangles the systemic mysteries of American capitalism, details its destructive collisions with society and demonstrates how people can achieve decisive influence to reform the system's structure and operating values.

Raised in Wyoming, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati, he graduated from Princeton University in 1958. He currently lives in Washington, DC.

Articles

News and Features

How the reckless Hobby Lobby decision has excited the imagination of the right wing.

He may be leading us toward economic catastrophe.

Actions speak louder; progress and poverty; learning from Teachout; don’t be fooled

If not, we must stop the Trans-Pacific Partnership before it does more damage to our country.

The trouble started when the party abandoned its working-class base.

There’s a frightening enthusiasm for war among pundits—and now the public seems ready to go along too.

German corporations are far more respectful of worker rights—and may have more influence on future US developments than our politicians realize.

This 100-year-old antique is undemocratic, too close to elite banking interests and often blind to the economic conditions that affect most Americans.

Blogs

Forty years later, we still haven’t confronted the true lesson of Vietnam.
Doug Hughes is not a dangerous fruitcake. In fact, he is a small-d democratic idealist who went out of his way to alert the authorities in...
The thought leaders of the Next System Project want to move past the narrow debate about policy and toward a conversation about the deeper...
After five decades of pretending otherwise, the Pentagon has reluctantly confirmed that Israel does indeed possess nuclear bombs, as well...
Israel’s nuclear superiority is a pivotal factor in the chaotic conflicts and occasional wars of the Middle East—it shouldn...
Hillary now claims she’ll implement progressive economic policies—but Bill said the same in 1992.
Instead of writing endless dope stories about a presidential campaign in 2016 and what might happen a year from now, shouldn’t the...