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Richard Kim | The Nation

Richard Kim

Author Bios

Richard Kim

Richard Kim

Executive Editor

Richard Kim is the executive editor of TheNation.com. He is co-editor, with Betsy Reed, of the New York Times bestselling anthology Going Rouge: Sarah Palin, An American Nightmare. Kim has appeared on MSNBC's Up with Chris Hayes, Melissa Harris-Perry, CNN, NPR, Al Jazeera, Democracy Now! and other media outlets. He has taught at New York University and Skidmore College. Follow him on Twitter @richardkimnyc.

Articles

News and Features

After the defeat of Arizona's SB 1062, the religious right nurses its persecution complex.

A new book raises the question: Are Amy Chua and Jed Rubenfeld racists—or just equal opportunity trolls?

With Duck Dynasty, A&E has a golden opportunity to get real.

The problems with the Affordable Care Act stem from government being too small and weak, not too big and powerful.

He’s a fraud and a wacko bird, but at least the Texas senator has the courage of his convictions. 

It’s hard to imagine a Democrat of national stature more ill-equipped to speak to the populist mood than HRC.

Supporters of mayoral candidate Christine Quinn trumpet the historic nature of her candidacy, but her record is nothing to be proud of. 

Republicans long ago embraced a whites-only political strategy—and continue to reap its rewards in Southern states.

There ought to be a response to violence besides callous indifference and total social warfare.

Blogs

The notorious Westboro Baptist Church pastor has died. Why were we so enthralled by him in the first place?
Why I stand with MHP—and why you should too.
Let us not dignify this incident by calling it a culture war.
A response to Rania Khalek. 
How did the straight, white guy win the Democratic mayoral primary in New York City?
Anthony Weiner is a weasel, a liar, a moron and a ridiculous egomaniac. It doesn’t take a picture of his junk to prove that.
There ought to be a response to violence besides callous indifference and total social warfare.
The problem isn’t that Americans are spending more money on stuff—they’re not. It’s that stuff has gotten cheaper.