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Moustafa Bayoumi | The Nation

Moustafa Bayoumi

Author Bios

Moustafa Bayoumi

Moustafa Bayoumi

Moustafa Bayoumi, a professor at Brooklyn College, is a co-editor of The Edward Said Reader (Vintage) and the author of How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? Being Young and Arab in America (Penguin Press).

Articles

News and Features

A new investigation by The Intercept reveals how racist anti-Muslim neocons are driving the nation’s law enforcement agenda.

The anti-Muslim hate that might have fueled the the Oak Creek murderer is more widespread than you think.

In the US today, the very ordinariness of Muslim-American life has become grounds for suspicion.

As his trial unfolds, Norway exorcises some of its xenophobic demons.

But now that the supposed widespread radicalization of American Muslims is being paraded around as political truth, it’s important to respond.

Tribalism is in vogue among conservative Middle East scholars. But a better understanding comes from investigating regional ties rather than sectarian divisions.

In Brooklyn, a beleaguered Arab-American community copes with bigotry
and heightened government scrutiny post-9/11.

Arab Americans are experiencing something similar to McCarthy-era
redbaiting, but the cold war performed better on racial justice than
Bush's "war on terror."

Military detainees have been subjected to starvation, sleep deprivation and now Metallica and Britney Spears. Blasted at high volume, torture music has become a weapon of war, used to destroy the minds of Muslim detainees. It's time for musicians to speak up.

Blogs

Let us realize that the best way to honor the loss of innocent life on one day is to remember taking of innocent life on all days.
On Tuesday, ten years after I got my green card and ten years into the war on terror, I became a citizen of the United States. Why I did it.
The NYPD compiled information on New York City mosques, ethnic restaurants, Muslim student associations. Ten years after 9/11, the national...
A decade ago, there was near-universal acknowledgement that profiling was unethical and ineffective. Yet the practice continues.