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Gary Younge | The Nation

Gary Younge

Author Bios

Gary Younge

Columnist

Gary Younge, the Alfred Knobler Journalism Fellow at The Nation Institute, is the New York correspondent for the Guardian and the author of The Speech: The Story Behind Dr Martin Luther King Jr.'s Dream (Haymarket). His previous books include Who Are We—And Should it Matter in the 21st Century? (Nation Books), Stranger in a Strange Land: Travels in the Disunited States (New Press), and No Place Like Home: A Black Briton's Journey Through the Deep South (Mississippi).

Articles

News and Features

The murder of Jordan Davis—like that of Renisha McBride, Trayvon Martin and so many others—reflects a racist culture in which the black body is considered fair game.

The people celebrate the man and the revolutionary, while venting frustration with the path his party has taken.

Europe’s panic is about race and class, not child abduction.

It’s not just here that the right has gone “wacko”—it isn’t interested in governing effectively in Europe, either. 

Instead of focusing on the psychology of Trayvon Martin’s killer, we should be examining the meaning of his actions.

Fifty years after the March on Washington, Dr. King’s most famous speech, like his own political legacy, is widely misunderstood.

South Africans of all races have reason to celebrate the life of the country’s first post-apartheid president.

The recent victories of the right-wing, anti-immigrant United Kingdom Independence Party says more about our scapegoats than about its long-term prospects.

The recent victories of the right-wing, anti-immigrant United Kingdom Independence Party says more about our scapegoats than about its long-term prospects.

In every way, her agenda opposed the interests of ordinary working people. How did she get so many of them to vote against their own economic interests again and again?

Blogs

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