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D.D. Guttenplan | The Nation

D.D. Guttenplan

Author Bios

D.D. Guttenplan

D.D. Guttenplan

D.D. Guttenplan, who writes from The Nation's London bureau, is the author of American Radical: The Life and Times of I.F. Stone (Farrar, Straus and Giroux).

Articles

News and Features

Founded by abolitionists to finish the job of Emancipation in 1865, The Nation became a moribund defender of the status quo. But its firm anti-imperialism, and one crusading editor, brought it back to life.

From World War I to Vietnam, from the red scare to McCarthyism, The Nation stood firm for civil liberties and civil rights, even when that meant being banned—or standing alone.

A forum for debate between radicals and liberals in an age of austerity, surveillance and endless war, The Nation has long had one foot inside the establishment and one outside it.

From the very beginning, the magazine has shown an eagerness to suck up to power.

Fed up with Thatcherite and New Labour politics, Scots have grown farther apart from their southern neighbors.

The career of Hunter Pitts O’Dell is a crucial episode in the hidden history of American radicalism. 

Like a lot of red revolutionaries, Abraham Cahan ended up to the right of where he began.

Fiorello La Guardia also took office in a time of crisis—and he was open to new ideas and bold reforms.

Jon Cruddas, who’s now leading a comprehensive policy review, says he wants to renew the party’s roots in English radicalism.

British investigations reveal the shocking extent of his shady tactics. Can we really believe he hasn’t used the same methods here?

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