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July 17, 2006 Issue

Cover art by: Cover by Gene Case & Stephen Kling/Avenging Angels

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  • Editorial

    A Politics of the Common Good

    A movement is growing that aims to build a politics of decency and sanity, which speaks to the generosity of the American people. It's not going to be easy, but it's time to rock the boat.

    Katrina vanden Heuvel

  • A President Rebuked

    The Supreme Court's Hamdan v. Rumsfeld decision is to Bush what the Pentagon Papers were to Nixon: a devastating rebuke of a President who thought he had a blank check and a clear affirmation of human rights and the rule of law.

    Bruce Shapiro

  • Project Corpus Callosum

    The winner of the first-ever Nation Student Writing Contest.

    Sarah Stillman

  • Barbara Epstein

    In 1963 a handful of distinguished literary intellectuals launched The New York Review of Books as an antidote to the lackluster prose and middlebrow sensibility of the New York Times

    the Editors

  • Harlan County Blues

    Life remains cheap in the coalfields of Appalachia because of the Bush Administration's incompetence and neglect in the face of human and environmental tragedy.

    Erik Reece

  • Chilling the Press

    Did the New York Times violate the Espionage Act by publishing reports of government secret spying program? A controversial essay in Commentary has provided intellectual ammunition to chill, censor and punish the press.

    Scott Sherman

  • American Patriots

    Here's a salute to America's true patriots: librarians on the frontlines of free inquiry, the Bill of Rights Defense Committee and peace activists across the nation.

    the Editors

  • We Don’t Believe in Politics

    If teenagers can't figure out how to participate meaningfully in politics, they will have lost their voice, impact and power.

    Camila Domonoske

  • Atrophy of the Well

    Few of us can now imagine a world without freshwater, but look to the future, when the scarcity of this most basic commodity will profoundly change our lives.

    LiAnn Yim

  • Wake-up Call

    By adopting the principles of natural capitalism, America can regain its sanity and reverse the reckless use, overuse, waste and destruction of our natural resources.

    Brie Cubelic

  • A Generation of Peace

    "I dream of the day that our children will turn the pages of history books and look to my generation, who said no to the horrors of war and chose nonviolence over nonexistence."

    Zaid Jilani

  • America’s Most Trusted Source of News: Ourselves

    Rather than let pundits guide our public policy debates, citizens must seize the initiative and join the conversation.

    Nikolas Bowie
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  • Books & the Arts

    A Politics of the Common Good

    A movement is growing that aims to build a politics of decency and sanity, which speaks to the generosity of the American people. It's not going to be easy, but it's time to rock the boat.

    Katrina vanden Heuvel

  • How to Create a Liberal Bestseller

    Progressives can take a lesson from the success of "How Would a Patriot Act?" Mobilize the liberal blogosphere and take an obscure book for a ride on the bestseller list.

    Jennifer Nix

  • Dazed and Confused

    A hallucinatory mix of animation and live action creates the Orwellian world of A Scanner Darkly; substance triumphs over style in Excellent Cadavers, a Mafia-busting documentary.

    Stuart Klawans

  • All About Eva

    In the late '60's, Eva Hesse's ambitious sculptures challenged the art world. Collected in a new exhibition, her art is even greater today.

    Arthur C. Danto

  • Shadows

    George Hutchinson's new biography of the mystery woman of the Harlem Renaissance reconsiders both Nella Larsen and a key moment of black cultural history.

    Darryl Pinckney

  • The American Political Tradition

    American foreign policy is shaped by a myth of national righteousness. In two new books, Peter Beinart abuses history to suggest liberals embrace this myth, while Stephen Kinzer uses America's history of involvement in foreign coups to reveal why we cannot.

    Andrew J. Bacevich

  • American Patriots

    Here's a salute to America's true patriots: librarians on the frontlines of free inquiry, the Bill of Rights Defense Committee and peace activists across the nation.

    the Editors
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