Scott Ritter Rips Peace Movement

Scott Ritter Rips Peace Movement

Former UN weapons inspector Scott Ritter, now an ardent anti-war campaigner, has let loose a blistering broadside against the rest of the peace movement. Calling it near "total collapse," Ritter slams the anti-war movement for being disorganized, chaotic and often "highjacked" by a plethora of progressive causes removed from the war itself.

It’s a worthy criticism — and one not far off the mark. Problem is, Ritter seems prone to make the same mistakes for which he is criticizing others. For him, it’s not enough –for example– that conservative Pennsylvania Democrat Jack Murtha has called for a U.S. troop pullback. Ritter also wants Murtha (and other Democrats who initially supported the war) to now formally recant and retract their earlier positions. That’s a great idea in itself. But it shouldn’t be the price of admission into the anti-war ranks.

Broadening the anti-war movement by focusing its message seems an imperative for success. Imposing litmus tests, on the other hand, seems self-defeating. I’ve got the whole story on my personal blog.

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Former UN weapons inspector Scott Ritter, now an ardent anti-war campaigner, has let loose a blistering broadside against the rest of the peace movement. Calling it near "total collapse," Ritter slams the anti-war movement for being disorganized, chaotic and often "highjacked" by a plethora of progressive causes removed from the war itself.

It’s a worthy criticism — and one not far off the mark. Problem is, Ritter seems prone to make the same mistakes for which he is criticizing others. For him, it’s not enough –for example– that conservative Pennsylvania Democrat Jack Murtha has called for a U.S. troop pullback. Ritter also wants Murtha (and other Democrats who initially supported the war) to now formally recant and retract their earlier positions. That’s a great idea in itself. But it shouldn’t be the price of admission into the anti-war ranks.

Broadening the anti-war movement by focusing its message seems an imperative for success. Imposing litmus tests, on the other hand, seems self-defeating. I’ve got the whole story on my personal blog.

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