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May 16, 2005 | The Nation

In the Magazine

May 16, 2005

Cover: Photo illustration by José Chicas/Avenging Angels

Browse Selections From Recent Years

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2005

2004

Studs Terkel hails Pete Seeger, Victor Navasky details the role of journals of dissent and Stuart Klawans reviews "Enron."

Editorials

The origins of the Princeton filibuster protest.

Democrats can draw no clearer distinction with the President than over the Iraq war.

Stephen Zunes writes: Amid the blare of the Bush
Administration's alarms about Iran's alleged nuclear weapons
capabilities, few remember that the United States, from the Eisenhower
through the

Nine years ago, when The Nation first went online, we thought putting up
selections from the magazine once a week constituted a major step into
the world of the web.

As part of a nationwide festival of tributes to Pete Seeger in 2005, Studs Terkel offered this essay on the life and times of an American balladeer.

Pity the once-mighty greenback.

The first 100 days of Bush's second term.

Columns

Music

Forget common ground--it's time to divide up the country.

Christ's self-appointed spokesmen now
Within the GOP enwrap
These lapdogs in such numbers that
They must be running out of lap.

Articles

A report from the May 1 rally for peace and nuclear disarmament.

Visiting the Lincoln Museum and exposing a dark chapter in the town's history.

Students succeed in making the university pull out of a Chinese oil company funding slaughter in Sudan.

Thoughts on the critical role of the journal of dissent in America.

Al Gore's Current TV debuts today. But will his new network transform the media?

Books & the Arts

Book

Kazuo Ishiguro is a writer renowned for his capacity to create
beautifully controlled surfaces and to beautifully evoke the roiling
emotions beneath them.

Film

Your movie reviewer has been reading Colin MacCabe's excellent book on
Jean-Luc Godard and pondering its discussion of France after World War
II.

Book

Being Stanley Crouch is about as bruising a vocation as there is in what
passes for--or remains of--polite literary society.

Book

Albert Einstein's banner year.