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July 11, 2005 | The Nation

In the Magazine

July 11, 2005

Cover: Cover by Gene Case & Stephen Kling/Avenging Angels, cover illustration by José Chicas

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2004

Peter Davis details human rights struggles in El Salvador, Thomas Geoghegan defends Europe and Israeli novelist David Grossman talks about the role of politics in his writing.

Letters

Articles on Bolivia, Pat Tillman and democracy in California attract comments and questions.

INTRINSA--NOT SO FAST...

Washington, DC

Editorials

With Ohio's GOP tainted by scandal and corruption, Democrats see an opening for 2006.

Senate Dems defending privacy rights move toward the majority, while their opponents stay in the minority.

Despite alarmist talk, the European economy is not in shambles.

As its July convention approaches, the AFL-CIO is on the brink of a major break-up.

Bush's political capital can't buy him support on the Iraq war and Social Security.

Columns

Column Left

Did those wily ayatollahs give us the purple finger again?

Music

Reframing abortion takes the issue out of its real-life context, which is the experience of women.

As long as I've lived in America I've enjoyed the comic ritual known as
the "hunt for the smoking gun," a process by which our official press
tries to inoculate itself and its readers against p

Articles

Getting the party started at the College Republican National Convention.

Because of spotty enforcement, white-collar criminals are far more likely to get away with their crimes than poor folks.

Alan Dershowitz is on the defensive over his research on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

El Salvador today is an Exhibit A casualty of the American imperium.

Forty years after the now-famous murders of three civil rights workers, racism persists in Mississippi.

Books & the Arts

Book

Graham Greene remains a compelling figure in this moment of moral bankruptcy.

Novelist David Grossman discusses Israel and the role of politics in his writing.