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World

World news and analysis from The Nation



  • November 27, 2000

    The Vietnam Peace

    The President has gone to Vietnam,
    A smallish country that we used to bomb
    But now would like to send our products to.
    And so our corporations take the view
    That if the country's ruling class has picked
    A form of rule that can be somewhat strict,
    That's up to them. And Clinton went to say
    That there is nothing standing in the way
    Of being friends with them forevermore.
    Remind me, please: Why did we fight that war?

    Calvin Trillin


  • November 22, 2000

    The American Conscience

    This essay, from the December 12, 1969, issue of The Nation, is a special selection from The Nation Digital Archive. If you want to read everything The Nation has ever published on war and human rights abuses, click here for information on how to acquire individual access to the Archive--an electronic database of every Nation article since 1865.

    the Editors

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  • November 2, 2000

    Anthropologists as Spies

    Collaboration occurred in the past, and there's no professional bar to it today.

    David Price

  • November 2, 2000

    America and the World: The End of Easy Dominance

    In the more trying period ahead, a modest internationalism would fare best.

    Sherle R. Schwenninger


  • November 2, 2000

    For Whom the Gong Tolls

    If you stand in Tiananmen Square and keep your eyes open on a normal day, you will see the tour groups with their "keep together" flags, and the long line waiting to see the mummified Mao in his mausoleum, and the crowd around the entrance to the Forbidden City. Souvenir salesmen ply their trade where once the students massed around the Goddess of Democracy. And then you notice the militia vans endlessly circling, and the buses parked off to one side. It's a big space to police, and its vast openness makes it impossible to close off. Every few days, a group of supporters of the Falun Gong movement will suddenly unfurl their banners and wave them until the forces of order arrive, sweep them up and carry them away.

    Christopher Hitchens