Podcast / See How They Run / Jun 29, 2024

What Can Jamaal Bowman’s Defeat Teach Us?

On this episode of See How They Run, Micah Sifry and Peter Beinart on 2024’s most divisive congressional primary.

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What Can Jamaal Bowman's Defeat Teach Us? | See How They Run
byThe Nation Magazine

On this episode of See How They Run, Micah Sifry and Peter Beinart join D.D. Guttenplan for a discussion about 2024's most divisive congressional primary.

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Representative Jamaal Bowman during a Get Out the Vote campaign event at Hartley Park on June 24, 2024, in Mount Vernon, New York.

Representative Jamaal Bowman during a Get Out the Vote campaign event at Hartley Park on June 24, 2024, in Mount Vernon, New York.

(Michael M. Santiago / Getty Images)

Last week, Jamaal Bowman–one of the most prominent progressive politicians in the country–was defeated in the primary for his New York congressional seat. The election laid bare many of the issues currently dividing Democrats: the battle between the establishment and the left, the role of money in politics, and, most bitterly, the party’s stance on Israel and Gaza.

So what does Bowman’s defeat tell us about the Democratic Party, particularly its left? On this episode of See How They Run, we’re joined by Micah Sifry and Peter Beinart to discuss how we think about the role of the Israel lobby, whose campaign against Bowman turned this race into the most expensive House primary in American history.

The Nation Podcasts
The Nation Podcasts

Here's where to find podcasts from The Nation. Political talk without the boring parts, featuring the writers, activists and artists who shape the news, from a progressive perspective.

What We Talk About When We Talk About the “Black Vote” | See How They Run
byThe Nation Magazine

On this episode of See How They Run, a wide-ranging conversation with Christina Greer, Steve Phillips, and Adolph Reed Jr.

If there's one thing everyone knows about American politics, it's that there is no way for a Democrat to win the presidency without Black voters. That's one of the reasons why, as Joe Biden fights desperately to stay in the 2024 election, he's made an aggressive effort to shore up Black support. In recent days, Biden has spoken at Black churches, given interviews to Black radio hosts, and leaned on the powerful Congressional Black Caucus to help bolster his political defenses.

But there are signs that Black voters may not be ready to turn out for Biden as fervently as he needs them to. in the past few months, polls have shown Black support for Biden slipping to levels Democrats have not seen in generations. So can Biden overcome doubts about his fitness, reverse these trends, and hold the White House? Should we even believe the polls? And are we in the middle of a historic shift in the relationship between Black voters and the Democratic Party?

To discuss all of this, D.D. Guttenplan is joined by a powerhouse trio of guests: Christina Greer, Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University; Steve Phillips, political strategist, Nation contributor, and author most recently of How We Win the Civil War: Securing a Multiracial Democracy and Ending White Supremacy for Good; and Adolph Reed Jr., Nation columnist and professor emeritus of political science at the University of Pennsylvania.

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D.D. Guttenplan

D.D. Guttenplan is editor of The Nation.

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